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April High Five: Wiki(d) research!

Amy Rees, 4th May 2018

Welcome to the April High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else!

This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in April that we’ve tracked the most attention for on Wikipedia.

#1 How many butterflies?

Image credit: David Raju https://www.naturetrek.co.uk/tour.aspx?id=549

Our first paper is “Larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, India” published in the Journal of Threatened Taxa lists the taxonomy of difference larval host plans.

“We present a systematic, updated checklist of larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, a globally recognized biodiversity hotspot. This includes recent new records, with a total of approximately 834 plant species/groups belonging to 88 families that are used by 320 butterfly species of the Western Ghats (the host plant records for 16 species are unknown).” Ravikanthachari Nitin, V. C. Balakrishnan, Paresh V. Churi, S. Kalesh, Satya Prakash, Krushnamegh Kunte

This publication was referenced 36 times on 36 different Wikipedia pages.

#2 Can you vet it?

Image credit: Biodiversity Heritage Library

The publication with the second most  Wikipedia attention is “A cabinet of the ordinary: domesticating veterinary education, 1766–1799”, published in The British Journal for the History of Science, looks at innovation of veterinary medicine in the 16th century.

“This paper reconstructs the Ancien Régime reasoning that veterinary students would benefit from a global perspective on animality, and the Revolutionary government’s rejection of that premise. Under republicanism, veterinary medicine became domestic.”

This publication was referenced in by 14 pages, with 17 citations.

#3 The objects in the mirror are closer than they appear

Image credit: Patrick L. Kelly et. al

The third paper “Extreme magnification of an individual star at redshift 1.5 by a galaxy-cluster lens”, was published in Nature Astronomy.

For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars’ light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models.” Patrick L. Kelly, Jose M. Diego, Steven Rodney, Nick Kaiser, Tom Broadhurst, Adi Zitrin, Tommaso Treu et al

This publication is referenced 7 times on 7 different Wikipedia pages.

#4 Does this look infected?

Image credit: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus

Our fourth publication is “Ortervirales: A new viral order unifying five families of reverse-transcribing viruses”, published in the Journal of Virology looks at the way viruses can mutate the RNA of various organisms.

Reverse-transcribing viruses, which synthesize a copy of genomic DNA from an RNA template, are widespread in animals, plants, algae and fungi.Mart Krupovic, Jonas Blomberg, John M. Coffin, Indranil Dasgupta, Hung Fan, Andrew D. Geering et al.

6 Wikipedia pages have referenced this publication 6 times.  

#5 That’s not my name

Image credit Jorge A. Herrera-Flores et al

Our final paper Taxonomic reassessment of Clevosaurus latidens Fraser, 1993 (Lepidosauria, Rhynchocephalia) and rhynchocephalian phylogeny based on parsimony and Bayesian inference, published in the Journal of Paleontology reassess the place of a dinosaur in the existing taxonomy language.

Our taxonomic review and both phylogenetic analyses reveal that C. latidens is not referable to Clevosaurus, but represents a new genus. We reassess C. latidens and provide an amended diagnosis for Fraserosphenodon new genus. Both parsimony and Bayesian analyses recover similar topologies and we propose formal names for two higher clades within Rhynchocephalia: Eusphenodontia new infraorder and Neosphenodontia new clade.” Jorge A. Herrera-Flores, Thomas L. Stubbs, Armin Elsler, Michael J. Benton

This publication is referenced 5 times on 4 different Wikipedia pages.

More reading:

  1. Larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, India
  2. A cabinet of the ordinary: domesticating veterinary education, 1766–1799
  3. Extreme magnification of an individual star at redshift 1.5 by a galaxy-cluster lens
  4. Ortervirales: A new viral order unifying five families of reverse-transcribing viruses
  5. Taxonomic reassessment of Clevosaurus latidens Fraser, 1993 (Lepidosauria, Rhynchocephalia) and rhynchocephalian phylogeny based on parsimony and Bayesian inference

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