Altmetric Blog

August High Five – Face(book) the facts

Josh Clark, 7th September 2018

Welcome to the August High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the articles that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else!

This month we’ll be focusing on the pieces published in July that have been mentioned in posts on public Facebook pages.

#1 The world is your oyster!

Credit: Adapted from Getty

Our first article this month is actually a careers piece, ‘Why it is not a ‘failure’ to leave academia’, published in Nature. The article discusses how PhD students can prepare and make informed decisions about career paths outside of academia:

‘Our direction should be the result of a conscious decision rather than a perception of a lack of opportunities. And it should have nothing to do with a sense or fear of ‘failure’.’ Philipp Kruger, “Why it is not a ‘failure’ to leave academia” (2018) Nature

This article received a huge response online – including an amazing 65 public Facebook page posts from 60 users. Many of the posts were academics and organizations recommending the article to their followers:

#2 Cutting carbs could cause calamity!  

Credit: Divily under CC0

The paper with the second most Facebook mentions last month is ‘Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis’, published in The Lancet Public Health. This article analyzes the long-term effect of restricted carbohydrate consumption on mortality.

‘Both high and low percentages of carbohydrate diets were associated with increased mortality, with minimal risk observed at 50–55% carbohydrate intake’ Sara B Seidelmann et al. “Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis” (2018) The Lancet Public Health

This paper received 56 posts to public pages from 56 users, many of whom shared the result and highlighted the benefits of a well-rounded diet:

#3 The effects of alcohol

Credit: Lernestorod under CC0

Paper number 3 this month is ‘Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016’, published in The Lancet. This paper looks at the contribution that alcohol consumption has on global disease and health loss:

We found that the risk of all-cause mortality, and of cancers specifically, rises with increasing levels of consumption, and the level of consumption that minimises health loss is zero.’ Max G Griswold et al.

The article has received 49 wall posts from 46 users keen to promote the findings of the study:

#4 Fantastic fossil findings

Credit: Christopher Rynn/University of Dundee

Coming in at number four is ‘Mum’s a Neanderthal, Dad’s a Denisovan: First discovery of an ancient-human hybrid’ published in Nature. The article gives an account of the discovery of a female who died 90,000 years ago who was the descendant of two different groups of early humans: Neanderthal and Denisovan:

‘With equal amounts of Denisovan and Neanderthal DNA, the specimen seemed to have one parent from each hominin group. But there was another possibility: Denny’s parents could have belonged to a population of Denisovan–Neanderthal hybrids.’ Matthew Warren

49 public wall posts from 46 users mentioned the article, with many excited to share the news:

#5 Time for change

Credit: qimono under CC0

The fifth most mentioned paper is ‘Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene’ published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. The paper proposes that the Earth may be approaching a planetary threshold that could result in much hotter climates, unless there is a change in the relationship between humanity and the ‘Earth system’.  

‘The impacts of a Hothouse Earth pathway on human societies would likely be massive, sometimes abrupt, and undoubtedly disruptive.’ Will Stefan et al.

The paper attracted mentions in 30 wall posts from 28 users; many of whom were warning their followers of the disastrous finding of the paper:


References:

  1. Why it is not a ‘failure’ to leave academia
  2. Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis
  3. Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016
  4. Mum’s a Neanderthal, Dad’s a Denisovan: First discovery of an ancient-human hybrid
  5. Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *