Altmetric Blog

Category: Altmetrics News

As 2012 draws to a close, the time has come to reflect on what has been an exciting first year for Altmetric. Though founded in the middle of 2011, we released our first products – the free bookmarklet, the Altmetric Explorer, and our API – in February. Altmetric started off as a side project and ended up as a start-up bootstrapped by an app competition, some great feedback from our early users, and kind support from Digital Science, who later went on to make a formal investment. In the blog post accompanying the Digital Science press release in June, the mission … Read More
Blaise Cronin, Rudy Professor of Information Science, Indiana University Bloomington, gave the lecture “The Numbers Game: Scholarly Communication and Digital Metrics” on Monday 10 December 2012 at City University London. He was introduced by Professor David Bawden. Professor Cronin’s extensive and influential publication record in the field of Library and Information Science covers citation analysis, informetrics, scholarly communication and strategic intelligence. In a pioneering article published in 1998, Cronin et al argued that the web fostered new modalities of scholarly communication and … Read More
How can alternative digital methods of scholarly assessment maximise the public impact of academic research? This is a question that all of us interested in alt-metrics have been asking ourselves. “Impact” is a term that can be understood in many different ways too. With this in mind we attended “The Future of Academic Impact” conference organised by the London School of Economics Public Policy Group on Tuesday the 5th of December 2012 at Senate House, London, which sought “to look forward to how impact research and measurement might develop over … Read More
  The use of “alternative metrics” (or alt-metrics) for assessing scholarly research impact was a hot topic in live and remote conversations surrounding this year’s SpotOn London conference. For the first time ever, there was an entire session devoted entirely to a discussion about the bourgeoning field. The session, called “Altmetrics beyond the numbers”, was run by Sarah Venis (Medicins sans Frontieres), Marie Boran (Digital Enterprise Research Institute), Euan Adie (from Altmetric), and Martin Fenner (PLOS). (An archived live-stream of the session can be viewed here.) If you were following the live … Read More
Two days ago, scientists, science communicators, journalists, developers, publishers, and  educators (to name just a few) descended upon London for the SpotOn London 2012 conference hosted by the Nature Publishing Group. “SpotOn”, which stands for science, policy, outreach, and tools online, brought together people who are passionate about improving scientific communication in the age of the Internet. With all the members of our team in attendance, Altmetric had a big presence at the conference. We helped to organise the Hackday fringe event and sat on the panel of the “Altmetrics beyond the numbers” session. Read More
… almost certainly not, is the short answer. Makes for a fun conspiracy theory though. Maybe once a month we see an article temporarily jump to the top of the attention rankings because it has been randomly selected as filler content by a Twitter spambot network. The intention, I guess, is that if you go to a Twitter user’s page and see only a big list of tweets about cheap car insurance you dismiss them as a spammer immediately but if you see a bunch of interesting, legit links mixed in you may start to wonder if there’s … Read More
“The Web lets us move beyond the article and beyond the Impact Factor. But, strangely…we haven’t. Or perhaps it’s not so strange when we consider that the scholarly reward system we’ve inherited is in fact built squarely on these two features.” Altmetrics pioneers Jason Priem & Heather Piwowar announce ImpactStory,  a new webapp aiming to provide a broader picture of impact to help scholars understand more about the audience and reach of their research. “The “publish or perish” model of the academic world has followed a similar pattern since the middle of the last century. It generally … Read More