Altmetric Blog

Category: High Five

Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for May! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers are all about health.   Image: Garbage on East Beach, Henderson Island. Credit: Jennifer Lavers. Paper #1. Plastic, Plastic Everywhere Our first High Five paper is “Exceptional and rapid accumulation of anthropogenic debris on one of the world’s most remote and pristine islands,” published in PNAS in May 2017. The study provides “a comprehensive analysis of the quantity and source of beach-washed plastic debris on one … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for April! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers describe high-impact findings that have to potential to change our perspectives on various scientific issues and questions. But some of these findings are controversial, and often require more evidence if they are to be paradigm shifts in our understanding of the world. Illustration: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia / Nature Communications Paper #1. Artificial Wombs Our first High Five paper is “An extra-uterine system to physiologically support the extreme … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for March! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers all come from high-impact journals. They are at times game-changing, controversial, groovy and thought-provoking. If they have anything in common, it’s that they all prompt potential changes in the way we think about how the world and its living systems work or worked in the past.   Great Barrier Reef. Image credit: Wise Hok Wai Lum, Wiki. Paper #1. Ode to Corals. Our first High Five paper, … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for February! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers all have big, catchy headlines, from the earliest life on earth, to earth-like exoplanets, to human longevity.   Tubes of hematite, an iron-rich mineral, might be evidence of microbial billions of years ago. Matthew Dodd/University College London Paper #1. The Earliest Life on Earth – Found? Our first High Five paper appeared in Nature last week with the headline-making title “Evidence for early life in Earth’s oldest … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s most popular research papers have little in common. However, the findings reported within them are all striking in some way, from eye-opening, to weird, to promising for human health, to controversial or downright disturbing. Without further ado… Credit: Bindaas Madhavi, Flickr.com Paper #1. Gender Stereotypes Hold Back Girls and Boys Our first High Five paper is “Gender stereotypes about intellectual ability emerge early and influence children’s interests,” published in Science … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s most popular research papers all describe findings of rather large proportions – some on firm footing and some on less solid ground. By the end of this article, your brain will be buzzing with questions.   A microelectrode array and a silicon model of a primate’s brain, as well as a pulse generator used to stimulate electrodes implanted on the spinal cord. Cred: Alain Herzog / EPFL Paper #1. Paralysed Monkeys … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s most popular research papers study objects that span from tiny brain plaques, to the oldest known microbes, to the world’s tallest mammal. It’s a month of extremes, in both objects of scientific discovery as well as occasionally science news headlines.     Histopathologic image of senile plaques seen in the cerebral cortex of a person with Alzheimer’s disease of presenile onset. Image credit: KGH/Wikipedia Paper #1. Cautious Hope … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s theme is solved (maybe) mysteries.   Greenland Shark. Image credit: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program Paper #1. Meet the Greenland Shark, The longest-lived Vertebrate Our first High Five paper this month is “Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus),” a report published in Science magazine. The paper provides evidence, through radiocarbon dating of eye tissue, that the Greenland shark … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s theme is Health all the way, from keys to human health found in noses and ancient bones, to bad news about bulldog health. Credit: Matt Madd, Flickr.com Paper #1. Is sitting all day bad for your health if you exercise after work? Our first High Five paper is “Does physical activity attenuate, or even eliminate, the detrimental association of sitting time with mortality?” The study … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s theme is Big Trends – trends throughout history for dinosaurs, human mortality, melting ice caps and more. Without further ado, here are the most popular academic papers in April 2016. Paper #1. If you aren’t rich, where you live affects how long you’ll live. Image credit: barnyz, Flickr.com Our first high five paper is “The Association Between Income and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2001-2014,” published April … Read More