Altmetric Blog

Category: High Five

Welcome to the September High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the articles that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else! This month we’ll be focusing on the pieces published in September that have been mentioned in posts on academic and non-academic blogs. #1 Bring your umbrella Image credit: ChristopherPluta under CC0 Number one on our list this month is ‘Climate model shows large-scale wind and solar farms in the Sahara increase rain … Read More
Welcome to the February High Five! We’re departing from our regular format of analyzing of the top five most mentioned papers from the past month. From now on, each month we’ll examine the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else! This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in February that we’ve tracked the most attention for in global news outlets. #1: The earliest art scene was created by Neanderthals Image credit: … Read More
Happy New Year and welcome to the Altmetric High Five for December 2017, where we look back on the hottest papers of the month! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s High Five papers could all be turned into New Year’s resolutions: Don’t get baited by cyber-trolls, watch your weight, forget the calcium pills, eat your vegetables, and be kinder to yourself when you come down with the flu (especially if you are a man!)   Credit: John Bauer – … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for October! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. Our papers this month feature findings that fall somewhere between being creepy and being awesome. It depends on how easily you’re scared. (Big, scary monsters can be awesome, too.)   Fireflies. Photo credit: Jon Liu, Flickr.com Paper #1. The Creepy Decline of Flying Insects Did you see any fireflies this summer? Our first High Five paper is Halloween worthy – not for the presence of things that go “buzz” in … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for September! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. Our papers this month detail a wide range of exciting and sometimes controversial discoveries, from the celebrated grave of a female Viking warrior, to a “pen” that can potentially detect cancer cells in seconds while a patient is on the operating table.     Viking Helmets. Credit: Helgi Halldórsson from Reykjavík, Iceland – Viking Arms and Armor Paper #1. Wonder Woman Our first High Five paper is … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for August! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. Apart from being the start of a devastating hurricane season in the United States, the month of August 2017 was all about human health in media coverage of scientific papers.   Beautiful carbs. Photo by Brisbane Falling, Flickr.com Paper #1. Fats before Carbs Our first High Five paper is “Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE),” published in … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for July! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. The theme for this month’s papers is Good News, Bad News, and Wow News. As we’ve seen before, many of the most popular scientific papers published in July revolve around human (and environmental) health.   Eadweard Muybridge – Provided directly by Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Paper #1. Living (microbial) Computers Could our future computers be living, literally made out of living cells? Our first High Five paper … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for June! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. June saw the return of a human health theme in media coverage about new research studies. Human health scares and updated information about the origin of Homo sapiens made headline splashes this month.   8 women with the same Body Mass Index rating (BMI – 30). Select Research, 09-09-08, via Wikimedia. Paper #1. Obesity and Health Our first High Five paper is “Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity in 195 … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for May! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers are all about health.   Image: Garbage on East Beach, Henderson Island. Credit: Jennifer Lavers. Paper #1. Plastic, Plastic Everywhere Our first High Five paper is “Exceptional and rapid accumulation of anthropogenic debris on one of the world’s most remote and pristine islands,” published in PNAS in May 2017. The study provides “a comprehensive analysis of the quantity and source of beach-washed plastic debris on one … Read More
Welcome to the Altmetric High Five for April! On a monthly basis, my High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month. This month’s papers describe high-impact findings that have to potential to change our perspectives on various scientific issues and questions. But some of these findings are controversial, and often require more evidence if they are to be paradigm shifts in our understanding of the world. Illustration: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia / Nature Communications Paper #1. Artificial Wombs Our first High Five paper is “An extra-uterine system to physiologically support the extreme … Read More