Altmetric Blog

Category: New Features

One of the things that appealed to me when I joined Altmetric recently was the distinctive visual ‘donut’ that illustrates the various different sources of attention that an article has attracted. Introducing Altmetric’s new bar visualisation. I really like how the donut’s fixed number of slices forces the eye to appreciate the approximate proportions of an article’s sources. Any visualisation that is more precise, such as a more conventional pie chart, tempts us to look too closely at proportions of one source against another, as well as potentially allowing one particular source which has generated loads of mentions … Read More
Diving deeper into scholarly attention with Mendeley Lately at Altmetric, we’ve been thinking about how to better showcase readership statistics from academics. We already do basic tracking of Twitter user demographics (which does include academics) but from that set of data, we weren’t been able to give much more detail on academic attention. And so it seemed logical for us to turn to a different service, like Mendeley, which already tracks readership information in quite some detail. Mendeley is a software platform that is very popular amongst scholars as a reference manager and e-reader. A user who saves a paper … Read More
We listened to your feedback… … and we’ve made it easier to export article- and journal-level attention data from the Altmetric Explorer! Any users who frequently insert Altmetric data into custom reports, spreadsheets, and other documents, will now find the exporting capabilities to be more reliable. The new improvements specifically affect the “Export articles” and “Export journals” buttons, found in the Altmetric Explorer’s Articles and Journals tabs, respectively: The changes also apply to the “Export to Excel” buttons for any saved workspaces (formerly known as Reports) in the “My Workspaces” dashboard:   What’s new? First of all, exported … Read More
Has your work been referenced in public policy? Whenever we talk to people about altmetrics, we explain how the attention data we collect may be able to help identify non-traditional forms of impact. So rather than only relying on citation counts and other traditional bibliometrics, we’re also interested in finding about the impact of research in society at large. As you might have already learned from our June press release announcing the launch of Altmetric for Institutions, we recently started tracking some highly impactful new sources of attention: policy and guidance documents. Specifically, we are now looking for references … Read More
How do you usually share your article’s Altmetric data? We’ve seen many authors (and sometimes their publishers!) get excited about the level of attention their article has received, and then tweet a link to the corresponding details page. The cool thing about tweeting the article details page is that under the tweet, you can actually see a snippet of the details page with the article’s title and Altmetric score. Of course, clicking through to the details page itself gives you the breakdown of attention by source, with the actual mentions listed.   What happens when I print an article … Read More
Changes are afoot for the Altmetric data! In January 2014, we will be extending our tracked sources to include pre- and post-publication peer reviews of articles from the Publons platform. Publons was first launched in early 2013, and aims to serve the needs of the wider peer-review community, including authors, researchers, and the reviewers themselves. The site currently has over 400 registered users, and is on track to have several hundred reviews on it by the end of the year. All of the post-publication reviews submitted are open access (pre-publication reviews can be open … Read More
We receive a lot of questions about the sources that we track. On our new website, we’ve put up a lot of detailed information about Altmetric’s data sources, including Twitter, mainstream news outlets, blogs, and others. On the main Sources page, you’ll find information at a glance about 4 key points for every source: Activity: How actively the source is used as a communication medium. Level of Insight: The depth of the insights that a typical mention in the source delivers. Content Creators: The kinds of users who create … Read More
Be notified when papers of interest are mentioned As an author of a scholarly paper, it can often be informative to read what people are saying and writing about your work. Alternatively, if you’re a reader or a blogger, you might be interested in knowing when a paper is mentioned on the news or blogged about. By opting to receive e-mail alerts about specific papers, you can follow the stories about the research as they develop.   Receive a maximum of 1 e-mail per day You can sign up to receive alerts pertaining to 1 or many papers. The attention surrounding multiple … Read More
Direct links to articles, links to news coverage, or mentions within text: online citation formats generally aren’t very consistent. Although bloggers who use the Research Blogging citation system cite articles in a specific manner, no such standardised system exists for mainstream news media. A large number of science news reports don’t even include links to the original papers that are mentioned, which creates a problem for measuring alt-metrics. Up until now, Altmetric has needed to see a direct link to an article in order to count a “mention”, so the absence of links in news reports meant that … Read More
New feature: LinkedIn mentions If you’ve browsed through the Altmetric Explorer lately, you might have noticed a new addition: the LinkedIn tab (see below for a screenshot). We’ve been collecting mentions of scholarly articles on LinkedIn for a while, and now all these data are part of the Altmetric score. Take the LinkedIn tab for a spin on this example article details page. Although counts from Twitter and Facebook still make up the bulk of mentions of papers online, the professional social media network LinkedIn is also being used by academics to discuss articles. So far, … Read More