Altmetric Blog

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CC-BY WOCinTech Chat / flickr Scientometrics researchers are well aware of how difficult and expensive it can be to access data for a bibliometrics study. That’s why Altmetric has created a free, easy way to find altmetrics data for research purposes: the Altmetric Researcher Data Access Program. In this post, I’ll introduce the Altmetric Researcher Data Access Program, explaining the criteria for accessing our data, how to access our data in a format that suits your needs, and how to apply to the Researcher Data Access program. About the Altmetric Researcher Data … Read More
This is the final post in a series of blog posts on the role Twitter plays in scholarly communication. This post is by, scientometrics researchers, Stefanie Haustein, Rémi Toupin and Juan Pablo Alperin. During the last weeks we have analyzed what types of scholarly documents get shared on Twitter, where those tweets come from, how they get shared and when Twitter activity occurs. Concluding our mini series on scholarly Twitter metrics, today’s … Read More
Welcome to the June High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else! This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in June to which we’ve captured the most videos on YouTube. #1 Immunotherapy Photo by Immunotherapy is magic under CC 2.0 Our first paper is “Immune recognition of somatic mutations leading to complete durable regression in metastatic breast cancer … Read More
This is the fourth in a series of blog posts on the role Twitter plays in scholarly communication by, scientometrics researcher, Stefanie Haustein. Tweets linking to scientific articles occur shortly after publication and Twitter activity often runs dry a few days later. The short-lived attention points to Twitter being used to spread the word about new publications rather than discussing them in-depth, as we discussed in last week’s blog post. In today’s post, we will analyze the temporal patterns of Twitter activity. As in … Read More
This is the third in a series of blog posts on the role Twitter plays in scholarly communication by, scientometrics researcher, Stefanie Haustein. It’s in the content and context of tweets that we can often find the most meaning. Unfortunately, most altmetrics research has analyzed counts and correlations rather than tweet content. In this post, I continue to analyze Altmetric data to explain how retweets and hashtags can help us better understand the degree to which users are engaging with research on Twitter. Of the studies looking at tweet content, one found that the majority … Read More
This is the second in a series of blog posts on the role Twitter plays in scholarly communication. This post is by, scientometrics researchers, Stefanie Haustein, Germana Barata and Juan Pablo Alperin. One of the initial hopes of altmetrics, particularly those based on tweets, was that they might help to democratize the data we use to understand research impact and make measures fairer by reducing geographical and language biases. Unlike citation data from the US-centric Web of Science, which by definition does not cover journals … Read More
Welcome to the May High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else! This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in May that we’ve tracked the most attention for on Reddit. #1 Heroin Hypothesis Photo by Brian Turner under CC 2.0 Our first paper is “Drugs should be legalised, regulated, and taxed” published in British Medical Journal, … Read More
The following guest blog post was written by Elizabeth Brophy, Journals Publishing Manager at John Wiley & Sons: Questions are what drive academic publishing. As a journal publisher, I am driven by the questions of the authors and editors I work with, and, in the ever-evolving publishing landscape, questions surrounding the presence, use, and impact of research articles online are becoming more prominent. These are the questions Altmetric can help us answer; many publishers, as well as libraries and institutions, now use Altmetric to track research outputs online, and whilst the way Altmetric presents its data has changed over … Read More
Welcome to the April High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else! This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in April that we’ve tracked the most attention for on Wikipedia. #1 How many butterflies? Image credit: David Raju https://www.naturetrek.co.uk/tour.aspx?id=549 Our first paper is “Larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, India” published … Read More
Over the last few years I’ve had the chance to talk with dozens of universities and research institutes who’ve had funding from the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 programme, whose evaluation dates are now, to many a sweating researcher’s brow, looming ever closer. During that time, one of the most keenly sought after areas for support from the Altmetric service has been that part of funding evaluation known as “Innovation Actions”.   Innovation is directly tied to Funding “Innovation Actions” are critical measures to the success of the research being funded by beneficiaries of the Horizon 2020 … Read More