Altmetric Blog

Category: Uncategorised

If you care about the real-world impact of a piece of research, a reference in a report by the World Health Organization or an African Union proceedings is a gold mine. Altmetric tracks policy sources that range from UN organisations to small local think tanks. We are constantly adding new sources to our tracking. Since the beginning of 2020 our policy database has grown from 83 major sources from 23 countries up to 224 sources from 55 countries at the time of this writing – and counting! In order to add a new policy source a developer writes a custom … Read More
In many parts of the world, water is taken for granted. Turn on a tap and it appears – clear, clean, trustworthy – whenever it’s needed. But this isn’t the case everywhere. Although decades of global efforts to ensure people have access to clean and safe water and sanitation have improved the situation somewhat, as of 2017, 2.2 billion people still lacked access to safely managed drinking water. There is a global effort to improve access to clean water and sanitation through the UN Sustainable Development Goals – specifically Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water … Read More
To all of our customers,  As some of you will have noticed over the past week, Altmetric has been experiencing some service issues, including downtime, reduced performance and misattributed data. This has been caused by a major incident at one of our infrastructure providers.  What happened? At approximately 0100am (UTC) on March 10th 2021, one of our infrastructure providers suffered a major fire, during which one of its data centres was destroyed. This caused an immediate outage for many of our services, lasting until 0335am. How have the Altmetric services been impacted? While all … Read More
Lucy Goodchild explores the findings and attention around a piece of research published in the previous month that caught the public’s attention. “I’ll sleep when I’m dead” is a phrase you’ve probably heard – or even used – and it’s often uttered by typically masculine men. Immortalized by Bon Jovi in the 1990s, the phrase conjures images of rock stars, CEOs and politicians. But why do we make that link? According to research, there’s a commonly held perception that men who sleep less are more masculine. And the psychologists behind the study believe this … Read More
The Altmetric Explorer provides search and analytical capabilities to help you understand trends and gather insights in Altmetric data. It also lets you run reports and download data for analysis using tools such as Excel. Explorer is divided into 7 tabs; you can dig into attention for any search by using the different tabs located at the top of the database. This quick overview will introduce you to each tab, but to learn more about the interface and searching, view an introductory guide for Institutions, Publishers, or Pharma.  In the upper right corner of each … Read More
In this post, Stacy Konkiel, Senior Data Analyst at Altmetric, highlights the most cited and discussed altmetrics-related research published this year. In 2020, over 100 articles, preprints, and book chapters were published based on analyses of Altmetric data—far too many to list in a single blog post! So, we’re changing things up for our annual “research roundup”. Here, I’ve highlighted the most discussed and cited Altmetric-related research published in 2020. Top altmetrics research, by Altmetric Attention Score Twitter promotion predicts citation rates of cardiovascular articles: a preliminary analysis from … Read More
Lucy Goodchild explores the findings and attention around a piece of research published recently that caught the public’s attention. Listen to the accompanying podcast episode here. Your alarm goes off. You stretch, wearily peel yourself out of bed and head straight for the coffee maker. At least, that’s what hundreds of millions of people do around the world every day. Globally, we drink an estimated 2.25 billion cups of coffee a day, making coffee beans one of the world’s biggest commodities. But why do we love it so much, and should we be worried about drinking it? According to … Read More
Over the last few years, one of the leading criticisms of the OA movement is that it seems to prioritise research in the so-called STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Medicine) at the expense of the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. To some extent, this is a valid criticism, although it can be partially justified by understanding that STEM research is by far, the larger proportion of research outputs, particularly in English. Where we have seen research into the benefits of OA publishing – in terms of increased downloads, citations – or broader and social impact … Read More
Those of you who are interested in current affairs may have noticed that a certain biomedical phenomenon has occupied much of the media’s attention over the last few months. Since we’ve covered this before, in both webinars and blog posts, I’ve decided to mostly look in a different direction and write about the other things that have been getting attention in the last three months. Not that we can get away from COVID19! As we’ve talked about before, the interest in research into the novel coronavirus has been as immense as the volume of … Read More
Lucy Goodchild explores the findings and attention around a piece of research published recently that caught the public’s attention. Listen to the accompanying podcast episode here. Sixty-six million years ago, three-quarters of the animal and plant species on Earth were wiped out. This mass extinction – known as the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event – meant the end of the celebrities of the dinosaur world: Tyrannosaurus rex, Ankylosaurus and Triceratops were among the casualties. It’s widely agreed that the cause of the extinction was a decades-long winter that made survival impossible for most species. Something blocked out the sun and … Read More