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June High Five – Thumbs up for YouTube

Amy Rees, 10th July 2018

Welcome to the June High Five! On a monthly basis, the High Five post highlights the papers that have received the most attention from a particular attention source type – whether it’s blogs, policy documents, Twitter, Wikipedia, or something else!

This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in June to which we’ve captured the most videos on YouTube.

#1 Immunotherapy

Photo by Immunotherapy is magic under CC 2.0

Our first paper is “Immune recognition of somatic mutations leading to complete durable regression in metastatic breast cancer”, published in Nature Medicine, the paper discusses a case where a cancer patient was able to reverse some of the damage using Immunotherapy.

“We present a patient with chemorefractory hormone receptor (HR)-positive metastatic breast cancer who was treated with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) reactive against mutant versions of four proteins—SLC3A2, KIAA0368, CADPS2 and CTSB.”

Zacharakis, Nikolaos et al. “Immune Recognition of Somatic Mutations Leading to Complete Durable Regression in Metastatic Breast Cancer.” Nature Medicine 24.6 (2018): 724–730.

This publication was referenced in two YouTube videos. One video, made by the channel QWERTY has been viewed more than 165 thousand times.  

#2 Cell Multiplication

Photo by Monocot Root: Zea under CC 2.0

The publication with the second most video attention is “Prospectively Isolated Tetraspanin + Neoblasts Are Adult Pluripotent Stem Cells Underlying Planaria Regeneration”, published in Cell, looks at the ground-breaking research regarding cell regrowth.

“large-scale scRNA-seq of sorted neoblasts unveiled a novel subtype of neoblast (Nb2) characterized by high levels of PIWI-1 mRNA and protein and marked by a conserved cell-surface protein-coding gene, tetraspanin 1 (tspan-1).”

Zeng, An et al. “Prospectively Isolated Tetraspanin +  Neoblasts Are Adult Pluripotent Stem Cells Underlying Planaria Regeneration.” Cell 173.7 (2018)

This publication was referenced in two YouTube videos. One video, made by the channel Atraviesa lo desconocido has been viewed more than 145 thousand times.

#3 Under cell pressure

Photo by cnicholsonpath under CC 2.0

The third paper “Redistribution of Adhesive Forces through Src/FAK Drives Contact Inhibition of Locomotion in Neural Crest” is published in Developmental Cell and looks at tension and cell separation.

“our results demonstrate that separation during CIL requires a reduction of CMAs near the contact upon collision in order to allow the transfer of tension to the CCA for consequent separation”

Roycroft, Alice et al. “Redistribution of Adhesive Forces through Src/FAK Drives Contact Inhibition of Locomotion in Neural Crest.” Developmental Cell 45.5 (2018)

This publication was referenced in two YouTube videos. They are both made by the channel Cell Press, one video was viewed 84 times.

#4 Making links

Photo by Patient Care Technician under CC 2.0

Our fourth publication is “Multiscale Analysis of Independent Alzheimer’s Cohorts Finds Disruption of Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Networks by Human Herpesvirus”, published by Neuron highlights the potential link between herpes and Alzheimer’s disease.

“The integrated findings of this study suggest that AD biology is impacted by a complex constellation of viral and host factors acting across different timescales and physiological systems (Figure 8B)”

Readhead, Ben et al. “Multiscale Analysis of Independent Alzheimer’s Cohorts Finds Disruption of Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Networks by Human Herpesvirus.” Neuron (2018)

This publication was referenced in one YouTube videos. The video was made by the channel SciShow, the video has been viewed more than 200K times.

#5 In-tree-guing article

Photo by Olivier Lejade under CC 2.0

Our final paper is “The demise of the largest and oldest African baobabs”, which was published in Nature Plants discusses the possible effect of climate change on some of the oldest trees in the world.

“We report that 9 of the 13 oldest and 5 of the 6 largest individuals have died, or at least their oldest parts/stems have collapsed and died, over the past 12 years; the cause of the mortalities is still unclear.”

Patrut, Adrian et al. “The Demise of the Largest and Oldest African Baobabs.” Nature Plants (2018)

This publication was referenced in one YouTube videos. The video was made by the channel SciShow, the video has been viewed more than 168K times.

References

  1. Immune recognition of somatic mutations leading to complete durable regression in metastatic breast cancer
  2. Prospectively Isolated Tetraspanin + Neoblasts Are Adult Pluripotent Stem Cells Underlying Planaria Regeneration
  3. Redistribution of Adhesive Forces through Src/FAK Drives Contact Inhibition of Locomotion in Neural Crest
  4. Multiscale Analysis of Independent Alzheimer’s Cohorts Finds Disruption of Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Networks by Human Herpesvirus
  5. The demise of the largest and oldest African baobabs

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