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Enhanced top soil carbon stocks under organic farming

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
54 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
linkedin
1 LinkedIn user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
259 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
523 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Enhanced top soil carbon stocks under organic farming
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1209429109
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Gattinger, A. Muller, M. Haeni, C. Skinner, A. Fliessbach, N. Buchmann, P. Mader, M. Stolze, P. Smith, N. E.-H. Scialabba, U. Niggli

Abstract

It has been suggested that conversion to organic farming contributes to soil carbon sequestration, but until now a comprehensive quantitative assessment has been lacking. Therefore, datasets from 74 studies from pairwise comparisons of organic vs. nonorganic farming systems were subjected to metaanalysis to identify differences in soil organic carbon (SOC). We found significant differences and higher values for organically farmed soils of 0.18 ± 0.06% points (mean ± 95% confidence interval) for SOC concentrations, 3.50 ± 1.08 Mg C ha(-1) for stocks, and 0.45 ± 0.21 Mg C ha(-1) y(-1) for sequestration rates compared with nonorganic management. Metaregression did not deliver clear results on drivers, but differences in external C inputs and crop rotations seemed important. Restricting the analysis to zero net input organic systems and retaining only the datasets with highest data quality (measured soil bulk densities and external C and N inputs), the mean difference in SOC stocks between the farming systems was still significant (1.98 ± 1.50 Mg C ha(-1)), whereas the difference in sequestration rates became insignificant (0.07 ± 0.08 Mg C ha(-1) y(-1)). Analyzing zero net input systems for all data without this quality requirement revealed significant, positive differences in SOC concentrations and stocks (0.13 ± 0.09% points and 2.16 ± 1.65 Mg C ha(-1), respectively) and insignificant differences for sequestration rates (0.27 ± 0.37 Mg C ha(-1) y(-1)). The data mainly cover top soil and temperate zones, whereas only few data from tropical regions and subsoil horizons exist. Summarizing, this study shows that organic farming has the potential to accumulate soil carbon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 523 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 1%
United States 5 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Argentina 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Kenya 2 <1%
Czechia 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 6 1%
Unknown 493 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 128 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 101 19%
Student > Master 95 18%
Student > Bachelor 32 6%
Other 23 4%
Other 98 19%
Unknown 46 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 209 40%
Environmental Science 138 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 33 6%
Social Sciences 17 3%
Engineering 10 2%
Other 39 7%
Unknown 77 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 136. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2019.
All research outputs
#119,318
of 14,131,022 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,823
of 81,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#858
of 132,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#37
of 934 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,131,022 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,849 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 934 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.