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Metastatic characteristics associated with survival of synchronous metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma in non-epidemic areas

Overview of attention for article published in Oral Oncology, April 2021
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Title
Metastatic characteristics associated with survival of synchronous metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma in non-epidemic areas
Published in
Oral Oncology, April 2021
DOI 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2021.105200
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mei Lin, Qi Yang, Rui You, Xiong Zou, Chong-yang Duan, You-ping Liu, Pei-yu Huang, Yu-long Xie, Zhi-qiang Wang, Ting Liu, Si-Yuan Chen, Yi-jun Hua, Ming-yuan Chen

Abstract

The current metastatic category (M) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a "catch-all" category, we previously successfully established a M1 subdivision system based on prognostic metastatic characteristics in epidemic areas. We aimed to figure out metastatic characteristics associated with survival outcomes of NPC in non-epidemic areas. A total of 428 newly diagnosed de novo metastatic NPC patients from 2010 to 2016 were analyzed from the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) were used to identify independent prognostic factors for survival. The most frequently involved metastatic locations were the bones (53.04%), the lungs (36.68%), the livers (29.21%) and the distant lymph nodes (24.07%). Univariate analysis indicated that bone involvement (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.09-1.77), liver involvement (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.12-1.85) and multiple metastatic locations (HR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.04-1.67) were negative prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) for patients with synchronous metastasis. We established a new M1 subdivision system based on metastatic characteristics: M1a, without bone and liver involvement; M1b, single bone or liver involvement; M1c, multiple metastatic locations including bone and/or liver. Multivariate analysis confirmed that our new subcategories were associated with significantly different OS (M1b vs M1a: HR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.11-2.16; M1c vs M1a: HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.47-2.78). Synchronous metastatic NPC patients with multiple metastatic locations involved bone and/or liver were prone to suffer from dismal OS and might need more attentions for selection of treatment modality.

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2021.
All research outputs
#15,115,840
of 17,100,199 outputs
Outputs from Oral Oncology
#1,091
of 1,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,544
of 156,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oral Oncology
#20
of 25 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.