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Maternal exposure to diluted diesel engine exhaust alters placental function and induces intergenerational effects in rabbits

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 418)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal exposure to diluted diesel engine exhaust alters placental function and induces intergenerational effects in rabbits
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12989-016-0151-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah A. Valentino, Anne Tarrade, Josiane Aioun, Eve Mourier, Christophe Richard, Michèle Dahirel, Delphine Rousseau-Ralliard, Natalie Fournier, Marie-Christine Aubrière, Marie-Sylvie Lallemand, Sylvaine Camous, Marine Guinot, Madia Charlier, Etienne Aujean, Hala Al Adhami, Paul H. Fokkens, Lydiane Agier, John A. Boere, Flemming R. Cassee, Rémy Slama, Pascale Chavatte-Palmer

Abstract

Airborne pollution is a rising concern in urban areas. Epidemiological studies in humans and animal experiments using rodent models indicate that gestational exposure to airborne pollution, in particular diesel engine exhaust (DE), reduces birth weight, but effects depend on exposure duration, gestational window and nanoparticle (NP) concentration. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of gestational exposure to diluted DE on feto-placental development in a rabbit model. Pregnant females were exposed to diluted (1 mg/m(3)), filtered DE (NP diameter ≈ 69 nm) or clean air (controls) for 2 h/day, 5 days/week by nose-only exposure (total exposure: 20 days in a 31-day gestation). DE exposure induced early signs of growth retardation at mid gestation with decreased head length (p = 0.04) and umbilical pulse (p = 0.018). Near term, fetal head length (p = 0.029) and plasma insulin and IGF1 concentrations (p = 0.05 and p = 0.019) were reduced. Placental function was also affected, with reduced placental efficiency (fetal/placental weight) (p = 0.049), decreased placental blood flow (p = 0.009) and fetal vessel volume (p = 0.002). Non-aggregated and "fingerprint" NP were observed at various locations, in maternal blood space, in trophoblastic cells and in the fetal blood, demonstrating transplacental transfer. Adult female offspring were bred with control males. Although fetoplacental biometry was not affected near term, second generation fetal metabolism was modified by grand-dam exposure with decreased plasma cholesterol (p = 0.008) and increased triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.015). Repeated daily gestational exposure to DE at levels close to urban pollution can affect feto-placental development in the first and second generation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 16 31%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Environmental Science 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Physics and Astronomy 3 6%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2019.
All research outputs
#372,676
of 14,093,691 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#11
of 418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,941
of 263,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,093,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them