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The trans-Himalayan flights of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus)

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
172 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The trans-Himalayan flights of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus)
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2011
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1017295108
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. A. Hawkes, S. Balachandran, N. Batbayar, P. J. Butler, P. B. Frappell, W. K. Milsom, N. Tseveenmyadag, S. H. Newman, G. R. Scott, P. Sathiyaselvam, J. Y. Takekawa, M. Wikelski, C. M. Bishop

Abstract

Birds that fly over mountain barriers must be capable of meeting the increased energetic cost of climbing in low-density air, even though less oxygen may be available to support their metabolism. This challenge is magnified by the reduction in maximum sustained climbing rates in large birds. Bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) make one of the highest and most iconic transmountain migrations in the world. We show that those populations of geese that winter at sea level in India are capable of passing over the Himalayas in 1 d, typically climbing between 4,000 and 6,000 m in 7-8 h. Surprisingly, these birds do not rely on the assistance of upslope tailwinds that usually occur during the day and can support minimum climb rates of 0.8-2.2 km·h(-1), even in the relative stillness of the night. They appear to strategically avoid higher speed winds during the afternoon, thus maximizing safety and control during flight. It would seem, therefore, that bar-headed geese are capable of sustained climbing flight over the passes of the Himalaya under their own aerobic power.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 4 2%
Brazil 2 1%
Japan 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 153 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 22%
Student > Bachelor 36 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 19%
Student > Master 14 8%
Other 13 8%
Other 39 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 112 65%
Environmental Science 15 9%
Unspecified 15 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 5%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 17 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2017.
All research outputs
#200,570
of 12,924,745 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,681
of 79,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,701
of 12,342,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,674
of 78,898 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,924,745 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,342,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78,898 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.