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Limitation of Grassland Productivity by Low Temperature and Seasonality of Growth

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Plant Science, July 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Limitation of Grassland Productivity by Low Temperature and Seasonality of Growth
Published in
Frontiers in Plant Science, July 2016
DOI 10.3389/fpls.2016.01130
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wingler, Astrid, Hennessy, Deirdre

Abstract

The productivity of temperate grassland is limited by the response of plants to low temperature, affecting winter persistence and seasonal growth rates. During the winter, the growth of perennial grasses is restricted by a combination of low temperature and the lack of available light, but during early spring low ground temperature is the main limiting factor. Once temperature increases, growth is stimulated, resulting in a peak in growth in spring before growth rates decline later in the season. Growth is not primarily limited by the ability to photosynthesize, but controlled by active regulatory processes that, e.g., enable plants to restrict growth and conserve resources for cold acclimation and winter survival. An insufficient ability to cold acclimate can affect winter persistence, thereby also reducing grassland productivity. While some mechanistic knowledge is available that explains how low temperature limits plant growth, the seasonal mechanisms that promote growth in response to increasing spring temperatures but restrict growth later in the season are only partially understood. Here, we assess the available knowledge of the physiological and signaling processes that determine growth, including hormonal effects, on cellular growth and on carbohydrate metabolism. Using data for grass growth in Ireland, we identify environmental factors that limit growth at different times of the year. Ideas are proposed how developmental factors, e.g., epigenetic changes, can lead to seasonality of the growth response to temperature. We also discuss perspectives for modeling grass growth and breeding to improve grassland productivity in a changing climate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 24 32%
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 5%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Unspecified 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 15 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2016.
All research outputs
#5,938,015
of 8,204,367 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Plant Science
#2,923
of 5,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,185
of 258,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Plant Science
#263
of 478 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,204,367 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,627 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 478 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.