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Evidence for an Opportunistic and Endophytic Lifestyle of the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus-Associated Bacteria Serratia marcescens PWN146 Isolated from Wilting Pinus pinaster

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, July 2016
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4 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for an Opportunistic and Endophytic Lifestyle of the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus-Associated Bacteria Serratia marcescens PWN146 Isolated from Wilting Pinus pinaster
Published in
Microbial Ecology, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00248-016-0820-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cláudia S. L. Vicente, Francisco X. Nascimento, Pedro Barbosa, Huei-Mien Ke, Isheng J. Tsai, Tomonori Hirao, Peter J. A. Cock, Taisei Kikuchi, Koichi Hasegawa, Manuel Mota

Abstract

Pine wilt disease (PWD) results from the interaction of three elements: the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; the insect-vector, Monochamus sp.; and the host tree, mostly Pinus species. Bacteria isolated from B. xylophilus may be a fourth element in this complex disease. However, the precise role of bacteria in this interaction is unclear as both plant-beneficial and as plant-pathogenic bacteria may be associated with PWD. Using whole genome sequencing and phenotypic characterization, we were able to investigate in more detail the genetic repertoire of Serratia marcescens PWN146, a bacterium associated with B. xylophilus. We show clear evidence that S. marcescens PWN146 is able to withstand and colonize the plant environment, without having any deleterious effects towards a susceptible host (Pinus thunbergii), B. xylophilus nor to the nematode model C. elegans. This bacterium is able to tolerate growth in presence of xenobiotic/organic compounds, and use phenylacetic acid as carbon source. Furthermore, we present a detailed list of S. marcescens PWN146 potentials to interfere with plant metabolism via hormonal pathways and/or nutritional acquisition, and to be competitive against other bacteria and/or fungi in terms of resource acquisition or production of antimicrobial compounds. Further investigation is required to understand the role of bacteria in PWD. We have now reinforced the theory that B. xylophilus-associated bacteria may have a plant origin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Taiwan 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,030,468
of 12,230,855 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#741
of 1,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,102
of 266,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#45
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,161 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.