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Improved drug-use patterns at 6 months post-discharge from inpatient substance use disorder treatment: results from compulsorily and voluntarily admitted patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Improved drug-use patterns at 6 months post-discharge from inpatient substance use disorder treatment: results from compulsorily and voluntarily admitted patients
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1548-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adrian R. Pasareanu, John-Kåre Vederhus, Anne Opsal, Øistein Kristensen, Thomas Clausen

Abstract

Treatment services to patients with substance use disorders (SUDs), including those mandated to treatment, needs to be evaluated and evidence based. The Norwegian Municipal Health Care Act calls for mandated treatment for persons with "severe and life-threatening substance use disorder" if these individuals are not otherwise willing to be voluntarily treated and consequently risk their lives over drug use. This study aims to examine substance use-related outcomes at 6 months following inpatient treatment and to analyse factors associated with improved outcomes and abstinence. This prospective study followed 202 hospitalized patients with SUD who were admitted voluntarily (VA; n = 137) or compulsorily (CA; n = 65). The European Addiction Severity Index was used at baseline and at follow-up to assess socio-demographic and substance use variables. Regression analysis was conducted to investigate factors associated with abstinence at 6 months of follow-up. The frequency of use of a preferred substance showed marked improvement for both VA and CA patients (61 and 37 %, respectively) at follow-up. Seventy-five percent of VA patients using amphetamine reported improvement compared to 53 % of CA patients. At follow-up, the CA group continued to have a higher rate of injection use. The CA group had experienced higher rates of overdose in the past 6 months and lower abstinence rates (24 % versus 50 %) at follow-up. A lower severity of drug use at intake (non-injection drug use), voluntary treatment modality, and higher treatment involvement during follow-up all were significant factors associated with abstinence at 6 months after treatment. Voluntary treatment for SUD generally yielded better outcomes; nevertheless, we also found improved outcomes for CA patients. It is important to keep in mind that in reality, the alternative to CA treatment is no treatment at all and instead a continuation of life-threatening drug use behaviours. Our observed outcomes for CA patients support the continuation of CA treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 41%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Researcher 3 18%
Other 2 12%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 6 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 12%
Psychology 2 12%
Unspecified 2 12%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,763,592
of 8,255,097 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#925
of 3,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,741
of 259,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#65
of 192 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,255,097 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,061 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,281 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 192 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.