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Movement reveals scale dependence in habitat selection of a large ungulate

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, November 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Movement reveals scale dependence in habitat selection of a large ungulate
Published in
Ecological Applications, November 2016
DOI 10.1002/eap.1403
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph M. Northrup, Charles R. Anderson, Mevin B. Hooten, George Wittemyer

Abstract

Ecological processes operate across temporal and spatial scales. Anthropogenic disturbances impact these processes, but examinations of scale dependence in impacts are infrequent. Such examinations can provide important insight to wildlife-human interactions and guide management efforts to reduce impacts. We assessed spatiotemporal scale dependence in habitat selection of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in the Piceance Basin of Colorado, USA, an area of ongoing natural gas development. We employed a newly developed animal movement method to assess habitat selection across scales defined using animal-centric spatiotemporal definitions ranging from the local (defined from five hour movements) to the broad (defined from weekly movements). We extended our analysis to examine variation in scale dependence between night and day and assess functional responses in habitat selection patterns relative to the density of anthropogenic features. Mule deer displayed scale invariance in the direction of their response to energy development features, avoiding well pads and the areas closest to roads at all scales, though with increasing strength of avoidance at coarser scales. Deer displayed scale-dependent responses to most other habitat features, including land cover type and habitat edges. Selection differed between night and day at the finest scales, but homogenized as scale increased. Deer displayed functional responses to development, with deer inhabiting the least developed ranges more strongly avoiding development relative to those with more development in their ranges. Energy development was a primary driver of habitat selection patterns in mule deer, structuring their behaviors across all scales examined. Stronger avoidance at coarser scales suggests that deer behaviorally mediated their interaction with development, but only to a degree. At higher development densities than seen in this area, such mediation may not be possible and thus maintenance of sufficient habitat with lower development densities will be a critical best management practice as development expands globally.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 4 3%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 110 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 25%
Student > Master 29 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 4 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 56%
Environmental Science 23 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 <1%
Mathematics 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 21 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2016.
All research outputs
#5,444,283
of 17,902,988 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#1,333
of 2,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,593
of 272,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#25
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,902,988 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,897 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,277 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.