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Analysis of the duodenal microbiotas of weaned piglet fed with epidermal growth factor-expressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Analysis of the duodenal microbiotas of weaned piglet fed with epidermal growth factor-expressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Published in
BMC Microbiology, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0783-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhongwei Zhang, Lili Cao, Yan Zhou, Shujin Wang, Lin Zhou

Abstract

The bacterial community of the small intestine is a key factor that has strong influence on the health of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in mammals during and shortly after weaning. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the diets of supplemented with epidermal growth factor (EGF)-expressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) on the duodenal microbiotas of weaned piglets. Revealed in this study, at day 7, 14 and 21, respectively, the compositional sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA in the duodenum had no marked difference in microbial diversity from the phylum to species levels between the INVSc1(EV) and other recombinant strains encompassing INVSc1-EE(+), INVSc1-TE(-), and INVSc1-IE(+). Furthermore, the populations of potentially enterobacteria (e.g., Clostridium and Prevotella) and probiotic (e.g., Lactobacilli and Lactococcus) also remained unchanged among recombinant S. cerevisiae groups (P > 0.05). However, the compositional sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA in the duodenum revealed significant difference in microbial diversity from phylum to species levels between the control group and recombinant S. cerevisiae groups. In terms of the control group (the lack of S. cerevisiae), these data confirmed that dietary exogenous S. cerevisiae had the feasibility to be used as a supplement for enhancing potentially probiotic (e.g., Lactobacilli and Lactococcus) (P < 0.01), and reducing potentially pathogenic bacteria (e.g., Clostridium and Prevotella) (P < 0.01). Herein, altered the microbiome effect was really S. cerevisiae, and then different forms of recombinant EGF, including T-EGF, EE-EGF and IE-EGF, did not appear to make a significant difference to the microbiome of weaned piglets.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 30%
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 45%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 10%
Chemistry 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,818,179
of 8,154,593 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#565
of 1,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,269
of 257,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#46
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,154,593 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,364 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.