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Is advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma a distinct entity from intestinal subtype gastric cancer? Data from the AGAMENON-SEOM Registry

Overview of attention for article published in Gastric Cancer, March 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 493)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
2 Mendeley
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Title
Is advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma a distinct entity from intestinal subtype gastric cancer? Data from the AGAMENON-SEOM Registry
Published in
Gastric Cancer, March 2021
DOI 10.1007/s10120-021-01169-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felipe Alvarez-Manceñido, Paula Jimenez-Fonseca, Alberto Carmona-Bayonas, Virginia Arrazubi, Raquel Hernandez, Juana M. Cano, Ana Custodio, Carles Pericay Pijaume, Gema Aguado, Nieves Martínez Lago, Manuel Sánchez Cánovas, Diego Cacho Lavin, Laura Visa, Alba Martinez-Torron, Aranzazu Arias-Martinez, Flora López, M. Luisa Limón, Rosario Vidal Tocino, Ana Fernández Montes, Maria Alsina, Paola Pimentel, Pablo Reguera, Alfonso Martín Carnicero, Avinash Ramchandani, Mónica Granja, Aitor Azkarate, Marta Martín Richard, Olbia Serra, Carolina Hernández Pérez, Alicia Hurtado, Aitziber Gil-Negrete, Tamara Sauri, Patricia Morales del Burgo, Javier Gallego

Abstract

Advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is generally treated similarly to advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ-AC) and gastric (GAC) adenocarcinomas, although GAC clinical trials rarely include EAC. This work sought to compare clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of advanced EAC with those of GEJ-AC and GAC and examine prognostic factors. Participants comprised patients with advanced EAC, intestinal GEJ-AC, and GAC treated with platin and fluoropyrimidine (plus trastuzumab when HER2 status was positive). Overall and progression-free survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression gauged the prognostic value of the AGAMENON model. Between 2008 and 2019, 971 participants from the AGAMENON-SEOM registry were recruited at 35 centers. The sample included 67.3% GAC, 13.3% GEJ-AC, and 19.4% EAC. Pulmonary metastases were most common in EAC and peritoneal metastases in GAC. Median PFS and OS were 7.7 (95% CI 7.3-8.0) and 13.9 months (12.9-14.7). There was no difference in PFS or OS between HER2- and HER2+ tumors from the three locations (p > 0.05). Five covariates were found to be prognostic for the entire sample: ECOG-PS, histological grade, number of metastatic sites, NLR, and HER2+ tumors treated with trastuzumab. In EAC, the same variables were prognostic except for grade. The favorable prognosis for HER2+ cancers treated with trastuzumab was homogenous for all three subgroups (p = 0.351) and, after adjusting for the remaining covariates, no evidence supported primary tumor localization as a prognostic factor (p = 0.331). Our study supports the hypothesis that EAC exhibits clinicopathological characteristics, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes comparable to intestinal GEJ-AC and GAC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 50%
Unknown 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 50%
Unknown 1 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,585,633
of 19,003,560 outputs
Outputs from Gastric Cancer
#13
of 493 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,841
of 309,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastric Cancer
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,003,560 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 493 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.