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Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Hygiene & Environmental Health, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in coliform water isolates
Published in
International Journal of Hygiene & Environmental Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ijheh.2016.07.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Stange, J.P.S. Sidhu, A. Tiehm, S. Toze, Stange, C, Sidhu, J P S, Tiehm, A, Toze, S

Abstract

Widespread fecal pollution of surface water may present a major health risk and a significant pathway for dissemination of antibiotic resistance bacteria. The River Rhine is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe and an important raw water source for drinking water production. A total of 100 coliform isolates obtained from River Rhine (Germany) were examined for their susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistances against amoxicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in 48%, 11% and 9% of isolates respectively. The antibiotic resistance could be traced back to the resistance genes blaTEM, blaSHV, ampC, sul1, sul2, dfrA1, tet(A) and tet(B). Whereby, the ampC gene represents a special case, because its presence is not inevitably linked to a phenotypic antibiotic resistance. Multiple antibiotics resistance was often accompanied by the occurrence of class 1 or 2 integrons. E. coli isolates belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1 (commensal) were more predominant (57%) compared to B2 and D groups (43%) which are known to carry virulent genes. Additionally, six E. coli virulence genes were also detected. However, the prevalence of virulence genes in the E. coli isolates was low (not exceeding 4.3% per gene) and no diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes were detected. This study demonstrates that surface water is an important reservoir of ARGs for a number of antibiotic classes such as sulfonamide, trimethoprim, beta-lactam-antibiotics and tetracycline. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance in coliform bacteria isolated from River Rhine provides evidence for the need to develop management strategies to limit the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria in aquatic environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 67 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 22%
Student > Master 14 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Unspecified 9 13%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 22%
Environmental Science 12 17%
Unspecified 11 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 10%
Other 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,578,752
of 11,553,067 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Hygiene & Environmental Health
#422
of 615 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,747
of 264,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Hygiene & Environmental Health
#10
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,553,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 615 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,092 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.