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The effect of complex workplace dietary interventions on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status: a cluster controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Preventive Medicine, August 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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174 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of complex workplace dietary interventions on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status: a cluster controlled trial
Published in
Preventive Medicine, August 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.05.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona Geaney, Clare Kelly, Jessica Scotto Di Marrazzo, Janas M. Harrington, Anthony P. Fitzgerald, Birgit A. Greiner, Ivan J. Perry

Abstract

Evidence on effective workplace dietary interventions is limited. The comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification and an educational intervention both alone and in combination was assessed versus a control workplace on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status. In the Food Choice at Work cluster controlled trial, four large, purposively selected manufacturing workplaces in Ireland were allocated to control (N=111), nutrition education (Education) (N=226), environmental dietary modification (Environment) (N=113) and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification (Combined) (N=400) in 2013. Nutrition education included group presentations, individual consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification included menu modification, fruit price discounts, strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and portion size control. Data on dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status were obtained at baseline and follow-up at 7-9months. Multivariate analysis of covariance compared changes across the four groups with adjustment for age, gender, educational status and other baseline characteristics. Follow-up data at 7-9months were obtained for 541 employees (64% of 850 recruited) aged 18-64years: control: 70 (63%), Education: 113 (50%), Environment: 74 (65%) and Combined: 284 (71%). There were significant positive changes in intakes of saturated fat (p=0.013), salt (p=0.010)and nutrition knowledge (p=0.034) between baseline and follow-up in the combined intervention versus the control. Small but significant changes in BMI (-1.2kg/m(2) (95%CI -2.385, -0.018, p=0.047) were observed in the combined intervention. Effects in the education and environment alone workplaces were smaller and generally non-significant. Combining nutrition education and environmental dietary modification may be an effective approach for promoting a healthy diet and weight loss at work.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 174 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 12%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Researcher 18 10%
Other 12 7%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 30 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 20%
Social Sciences 12 7%
Psychology 11 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 6%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 41 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2019.
All research outputs
#8,272,543
of 15,019,833 outputs
Outputs from Preventive Medicine
#2,838
of 3,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,656
of 265,540 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Preventive Medicine
#58
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,019,833 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.9. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,540 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.