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Synthesis and electrochemical detection of a thiazolyl-indole natural product isolated from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Overview of attention for article published in Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, July 2016
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3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Synthesis and electrochemical detection of a thiazolyl-indole natural product isolated from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Published in
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00216-016-9749-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alyah Buzid, Eoin Ó Muimhneacháin, F. Jerry Reen, Phyllis E. Hayes, Leticia M. Pardo, Fengjun Shang, Fergal O’Gara, Jonathan Sperry, John H. T. Luong, Jeremy D. Glennon, Gerard P. McGlacken

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, capable of surviving in a broad range of natural environments and quickly acquiring resistance. It is associated with hospital-acquired infections, particularly in patients with compromised immunity, and is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa is also of nosocomial importance on dairy farms and veterinary hospitals, where it is a key morbidity factor in bovine mastitis. P. aeruginosa uses a cell-cell communication system consisting of signalling molecules to coordinate bacterial secondary metabolites, biofilm formation, and virulence. Simple and sensitive methods for the detection of biomolecules as indicators of P. aeruginosa infection would be of great clinical importance. Here, we report the synthesis of the P. aeruginosa natural product, barakacin, which was recently isolated from the bovine ruminal strain ZIO. A simple and sensitive electrochemical method was used for barakacin detection using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, based on cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The influence of electrolyte pH on the peak potential and peak currents was also investigated. At pH 2.0, the peak current was linearly dependent on barakacin concentration (in the range used, 1-10 μM), with correlation coefficients greater than 0.98 on both electrodes. The detection limit (S/N = 3) on the BDD electrode was 100-fold lower than that obtained on the GC electrode. The optimized method using the BDD electrode was extended to bovine (cow feces) and human (sputum of a CF patient) samples. Spiked barakacin was easily detected in these matrices at a limit of 0.5 and 0.05 μM, respectively. Graphical abstract Electrochemical detection of barakacin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Pakistan 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 7 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Engineering 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,030,234
of 12,230,555 outputs
Outputs from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#2,121
of 4,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,748
of 265,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#42
of 248 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,555 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,657 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 248 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.