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Pregnant women and infants as sentinel populations to monitor prevalence of malaria: results of pilot study in Lake Zone of Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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95 Mendeley
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Title
Pregnant women and infants as sentinel populations to monitor prevalence of malaria: results of pilot study in Lake Zone of Tanzania
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1441-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ritha A. Willilo, Fabrizio Molteni, Renata Mandike, Frances E. Mugalura, Anold Mutafungwa, Adella Thadeo, Edwin Benedictor, Jessica M. Kafuko, Naomi Kaspar, Mahdi M. Ramsan, Osia Mwaipape, Peter D. McElroy, Julie Gutman, Rajeev Colaco, Richard Reithinger, Jeremiah M. Ngondi

Abstract

As malaria control interventions are scaled-up, rational approaches are needed for monitoring impact over time. One proposed approach includes monitoring the prevalence of malaria infection among pregnant women and children at the time of routine preventive health facility (HF) visits. This pilot explored the feasibility and utility of tracking the prevalence of malaria infection in pregnant women attending their first antenatal care (ANC) visit and infants presenting at 9-12 months of age for measles vaccination. Pregnant women attending first ANC and infants nine to 12 months old presenting for measles vaccination at a non-probability sample of 54 HFs in Tanzania's Lake Zone (Mara, Mwanza and Kagera Regions) were screened for malaria infection using a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) from December 2012 to November 2013, regardless of symptoms. Participants who tested positive were treated for malaria per national guidelines. Data were collected monthly. Overall 89.9 and 78.1 % of expected monthly reports on malaria infection prevalence were received for pregnant women and infants, respectively. Among 51,467 pregnant women and 35,155 infants attending routine preventive HF visits, 41.2 and 37.3 % were tested with RDT, respectively. Malaria infection prevalence was 12.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 11.3-14.3] among pregnant women and 11.0 % (95 % CI 9.5-12.5) among infants, and varied by month. There was good correlation of the prevalence of malaria among pregnant women and infants at the HF level (Spearman rho = 0.6; p < 0.001). This approach is estimated to cost $1.28 for every person tested, with the RDT accounting for 72 % of the cost. Malaria infection was common and well correlated among pregnant women and infants attending routine health services. Routine screening of these readily accessible populations may offer a practical strategy for continuously tracking malaria trends, particularly seasonal variation. Positivity rates among afebrile individuals presenting for routine care offer an advantage as they are unaffected by the prevalence of other causes of febrile illness, which could influence positivity rates among febrile patients presenting to outpatient clinics. The data presented here suggest that in addition to contributing to clinical management, ongoing screening of pregnant women could be used for routine surveillance and detection of hotspots.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 31%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 6%
Other 16 17%
Unknown 19 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#8,717,287
of 16,121,523 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,651
of 4,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,119
of 266,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,121,523 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them