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Sequencing of 50 Human Exomes Reveals Adaptation to High Altitude

Overview of attention for article published in Science, July 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters
patent
2 patents
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
684 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1042 Mendeley
citeulike
20 CiteULike
Title
Sequencing of 50 Human Exomes Reveals Adaptation to High Altitude
Published in
Science, July 2010
DOI 10.1126/science.1190371
Pubmed ID
Authors

X. Yi, Y. Liang, E. Huerta-Sanchez, X. Jin, Z. X. P. Cuo, J. E. Pool, X. Xu, H. Jiang, N. Vinckenbosch, T. S. Korneliussen, H. Zheng, T. Liu, W. He, K. Li, R. Luo, X. Nie, H. Wu, M. Zhao, H. Cao, J. Zou, Y. Shan, S. Li, Q. Yang, Asan, P. Ni, G. Tian, J. Xu, X. Liu, T. Jiang, R. Wu, G. Zhou, M. Tang, J. Qin, T. Wang, S. Feng, G. Li, Huasang, J. Luosang, W. Wang, F. Chen, Y. Wang, X. Zheng, Z. Li, Z. Bianba, G. Yang, X. Wang, S. Tang, G. Gao, Y. Chen, Z. Luo, L. Gusang, Z. Cao, Q. Zhang, W. Ouyang, X. Ren, H. Liang, H. Zheng, Y. Huang, J. Li, L. Bolund, K. Kristiansen, Y. Li, Y. Zhang, X. Zhang, R. Li, S. Li, H. Yang, R. Nielsen, J. Wang, J. Wang

Abstract

Residents of the Tibetan Plateau show heritable adaptations to extreme altitude. We sequenced 50 exomes of ethnic Tibetans, encompassing coding sequences of 92% of human genes, with an average coverage of 18x per individual. Genes showing population-specific allele frequency changes, which represent strong candidates for altitude adaptation, were identified. The strongest signal of natural selection came from endothelial Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein 1 (EPAS1), a transcription factor involved in response to hypoxia. One single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at EPAS1 shows a 78% frequency difference between Tibetan and Han samples, representing the fastest allele frequency change observed at any human gene to date. This SNP's association with erythrocyte abundance supports the role of EPAS1 in adaptation to hypoxia. Thus, a population genomic survey has revealed a functionally important locus in genetic adaptation to high altitude.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,042 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 44 4%
United Kingdom 8 <1%
China 7 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Switzerland 6 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
Brazil 4 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
Other 22 2%
Unknown 934 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 306 29%
Researcher 242 23%
Student > Master 123 12%
Student > Bachelor 106 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 64 6%
Other 201 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 667 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 178 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 46 4%
Unspecified 42 4%
Computer Science 28 3%
Other 81 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 280. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2019.
All research outputs
#37,625
of 12,493,082 outputs
Outputs from Science
#1,619
of 58,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,936
of 11,937,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#1,619
of 58,748 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,493,082 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 58,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,937,282 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58,748 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.