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Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10-year experience in allergy work-up

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Allergy & Immunology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
Non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics in children - our 10-year experience in allergy work-up
Published in
Pediatric Allergy & Immunology, May 2016
DOI 10.1111/pai.12565
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marina Atanaskovic-Markovic, Francesco Gaeta, Biljana Medjo, Marija Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Tanja Cirkovic Velickovic, Vladimir Tmusic, Antonino Romano

Abstract

Non-immediate reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics (BL) occur more than one hour after drug administration and the most common manifestations are maculopapular exanthemas and delayed-appearing urticaria and/or angioedema. Infections can lead to skin eruptions and mimic drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR), if a drug is taken at the same time. The most of children are labeled as "drug allergic" after considering only the clinical history. To diagnose/detect a hypersensitivity or an infection which mimic DHR in children with non-immediate reactions to BL METHODS: A prospective survey was conducted in a group of 1,026 children with histories of non-immediate reactions to BL by performing patch tests, skin tests, and in case of negative results, drug provocation tests (DPT). In 300 children, a study was performed to detect infections by viruses or Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urticaria and maculopapular exanthemas were the most reported non-immediate reactions. Only 76 (7.4%) of 1,026 children had confirmed non-immediate hypersensitivity reactions to BL. Fifty-seven children had positive delayed-reading intradermal tests (18 of these with a positive patch test). Nineteen children had positive DPT. Sixty-six of 300 children had positive tests for viruses or Mycoplasma pneumoniae and 2 of them had a positive allergy work-up. A diagnostic work-up should be performed in all children with non-immediate reactions to BL, in order to remove a false label of hypersensitivity. Even though only 57 (5.5%) of 1,026 children displayed positive responses to delayed-reading intradermal tests to BL, such tests appear to be useful in order to reduce the risk for positive DPTs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 9 19%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 56%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 12 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2021.
All research outputs
#1,569,263
of 18,917,096 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Allergy & Immunology
#158
of 1,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,488
of 273,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Allergy & Immunology
#3
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,917,096 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,790 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,740 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.