↓ Skip to main content

Altered skeletal muscle (mitochondrial) properties in patients with mitochondrial DNA single deletion myopathy

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Altered skeletal muscle (mitochondrial) properties in patients with mitochondrial DNA single deletion myopathy
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13023-016-0488-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saskia Maria Gehrig, Violeta Mihaylova, Sebastian Frese, Sandro Manuel Mueller, Maria Ligon-Auer, Christina M. Spengler, Jens A. Petersen, Carsten Lundby, Hans H. Jung

Abstract

Mitochondrial myopathy severely affects skeletal muscle structure and function resulting in defective oxidative phosphorylation. However, the major pathomechanisms and therewith effective treatment approaches remain elusive. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate disease-related impairments in skeletal muscle properties in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. Accordingly, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from six patients with moleculargenetically diagnosed mitochondrial myopathy (one male and five females, 53 ± 9 years) and eight age- and gender-matched healthy controls (two males and six females, 58 ± 14 years) to determine mitochondrial respiratory capacity of complex I-V, mitochondrial volume density and fiber type distribution. Mitochondrial volume density (4.0 ± 0.5 vs. 5.1 ± 0.8 %) as well as respiratory capacity of complex I-V were lower (P < 0.05) in mitochondrial myopathy and associated with a higher (P < 0.001) proportion of type II fibers (65.2 ± 3.6 vs. 44.3 ± 5.9 %). Additionally, mitochondrial volume density and maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity correlated positively (P < 0.05) to peak oxygen uptake. Mitochondrial myopathy leads to impaired mitochondrial quantity and quality and a shift towards a more glycolytic skeletal muscle phenotype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Sports and Recreations 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 7 30%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,189,752
of 8,150,076 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#938
of 1,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,866
of 257,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#46
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,150,076 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,117 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,747 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.