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Climate change and elevational diversity capacity: do weedy species take up the slack?

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, October 2012
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Climate change and elevational diversity capacity: do weedy species take up the slack?
Published in
Biology Letters, October 2012
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0806
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. L. Chown, P. C. le Roux, T. Ramaswiela, J. M. Kalwij, J. D. Shaw, M. A. McGeoch

Abstract

Climate change leads to species range shifts and consequently to changes in diversity. For many systems, increases in diversity capacity have been forecast, with spare capacity to be taken up by a pool of weedy species moved around by humans. Few tests of this hypothesis have been undertaken, and in many temperate systems, climate change impacts may be confounded by simultaneous increases in human-related disturbance, which also promote weedy species. Areas to which weedy species are being introduced, but with little human disturbance, are therefore ideal for testing the idea. We make predictions about how such diversity capacity increases play out across elevational gradients in non-water-limited systems. Then, using modern and historical data on the elevational range of indigenous and naturalized alien vascular plant species from the relatively undisturbed sub-Antarctic Marion Island, we show that alien species have contributed significantly to filling available diversity capacity and that increases in energy availability rather than disturbance are the probable underlying cause.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 66 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Other 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 50%
Environmental Science 22 31%
Unspecified 6 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2018.
All research outputs
#3,267,678
of 12,487,163 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#1,630
of 2,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,442
of 141,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#44
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,487,163 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,340 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.0. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,992 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.