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Changes in PYY and gastric emptying across the phases of the menstrual cycle and the influence of the ovarian hormones

Overview of attention for article published in Appetite, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
Title
Changes in PYY and gastric emptying across the phases of the menstrual cycle and the influence of the ovarian hormones
Published in
Appetite, December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2016.07.027
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Campolier, Sangeetha Pariyarath Thondre, Miriam Clegg, Amir Shafat, Ali Mcintosh, Helen Lightowler

Abstract

Nutrition-related studies avoid the participation of pre-menopausal women due to the potential effect of the menstrual cycle (MC) on their appetite regulation. It is generally accepted that women increase their energy intake during the luteal phase (LPh) compared to the follicular (FPh), however what happens in the menstrual phase (MPh) and how this might be regulated remains uncertain. Although some research indicates changes in the gastric emptying (GE) velocity, whether PYY is affected by the MC phase, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether eating the same breakfast in each of the three MC phases would change the GE time, the PYY response and post-prandial satiety such that they might affect subsequent food intake. Furthermore, the aim was to associate any potential differences to the fluctuations in estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) within a MC. Nine naturally cycling women attended to the laboratory to consume a standardised breakfast on three occasions, each of them representing one of the MC phases. Breath samples to measure GE time, plasma samples to quantify PYY levels and hunger scores were collected for a total of 4 h after which food intake was assessed by an ad-libitum buffet lunch. GE and PYY levels changed significantly across the phases of the MC (p < 0.05). GE was correlated to P4 and E2-P4 ratio (r = -0.5 and 0.4, respectively). To conclude, the appetite regulators PYY and GE time change depending upon the MC phases with GE time associated with the ovarian hormone levels which suggests the necessity of controlling the MC phase in studies looking at the appetite response.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 15 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Sports and Recreations 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 15 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,844,424
of 12,368,793 outputs
Outputs from Appetite
#1,313
of 2,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,552
of 264,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Appetite
#35
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,368,793 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,967 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.