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Enterotypes of the human gut microbiome

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Citations

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2780 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
4589 Mendeley
citeulike
59 CiteULike
connotea
4 Connotea
Title
Enterotypes of the human gut microbiome
Published in
Nature, April 2011
DOI 10.1038/nature09944
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manimozhiyan Arumugam, Jeroen Raes, Eric Pelletier, Denis Le Paslier, Takuji Yamada, Daniel R. Mende, Gabriel R. Fernandes, Julien Tap, Thomas Bruls, Jean-Michel Batto, Marcelo Bertalan, Natalia Borruel, Francesc Casellas, Leyden Fernandez, Laurent Gautier, Torben Hansen, Masahira Hattori, Tetsuya Hayashi, Michiel Kleerebezem, Ken Kurokawa, Marion Leclerc, Florence Levenez, Chaysavanh Manichanh, H. Bjørn Nielsen, Trine Nielsen, Nicolas Pons, Julie Poulain, Junjie Qin, Thomas Sicheritz-Ponten, Sebastian Tims, David Torrents, Edgardo Ugarte, Erwin G. Zoetendal, Jun Wang, Francisco Guarner, Oluf Pedersen, Willem M. de Vos, Søren Brunak, Joel Doré, Jean Weissenbach, S. Dusko Ehrlich, Peer Bork

Abstract

Our knowledge of species and functional composition of the human gut microbiome is rapidly increasing, but it is still based on very few cohorts and little is known about variation across the world. By combining 22 newly sequenced faecal metagenomes of individuals from four countries with previously published data sets, here we identify three robust clusters (referred to as enterotypes hereafter) that are not nation or continent specific. We also confirmed the enterotypes in two published, larger cohorts, indicating that intestinal microbiota variation is generally stratified, not continuous. This indicates further the existence of a limited number of well-balanced host-microbial symbiotic states that might respond differently to diet and drug intake. The enterotypes are mostly driven by species composition, but abundant molecular functions are not necessarily provided by abundant species, highlighting the importance of a functional analysis to understand microbial communities. Although individual host properties such as body mass index, age, or gender cannot explain the observed enterotypes, data-driven marker genes or functional modules can be identified for each of these host properties. For example, twelve genes significantly correlate with age and three functional modules with the body mass index, hinting at a diagnostic potential of microbial markers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4,589 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 124 3%
Germany 23 <1%
France 21 <1%
United Kingdom 20 <1%
Netherlands 16 <1%
Spain 15 <1%
Denmark 15 <1%
Japan 10 <1%
Canada 9 <1%
Other 105 2%
Unknown 4231 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1061 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1029 22%
Student > Master 661 14%
Student > Bachelor 555 12%
Unspecified 241 5%
Other 1041 23%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2089 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 643 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 619 13%
Unspecified 359 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 222 5%
Other 656 14%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 265. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2019.
All research outputs
#43,350
of 13,044,078 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#4,785
of 68,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,489
of 12,446,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#4,677
of 67,924 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,078 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,535 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 74.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,446,695 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67,924 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.