↓ Skip to main content

A HELLP syndrome complicates a gestational trophoblastic neoplasia in a perimenopausal woman: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A HELLP syndrome complicates a gestational trophoblastic neoplasia in a perimenopausal woman: a case report
Published in
BMC Cancer, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2641-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guillaume Vogin, François Golfier, Touria Hajri, Agnès Leroux, Béatrice Weber

Abstract

HELLP syndrome is a combination of symptoms described as hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, that complicates 0.01-0.6 % of pregnancies. HELLP syndrome has been scarcely reported associated with partial moles, another rare complication of pregnancy. This manuscript describes the only reported case of HELLP syndrome associated with a complete invasive hydatiform mole. We report a perimenopausal patient in prolonged remission from an uncommon high-risk invasive complete mole. The diagnosis was set in a context of early onset preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The development of life-threatening complications required primary hysterectomy. Postoperative hCG quickly returned to normal with EMA/CO multi-agent chemotherapy. Our patient is in prolonged remission from a complete mole complicated with EOP and HELLP syndrome. This exceptional case of complicated gestational trophoblastic neoplasia reflects a very rare condition in which several risk factors for placental ischemia are associated. Emergency hysterectomy should be considered as salvage initial treatment in such life-threatening situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 31%
Researcher 4 25%
Lecturer 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 25%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 19%
Unspecified 1 6%
Unknown 4 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,058,937
of 8,155,605 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,792
of 3,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,705
of 257,721 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#180
of 251 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,155,605 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,451 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,721 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 251 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.