↓ Skip to main content

Baseline Functioning and Stress Reactivity in Maltreating Parents and At-Risk Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Child Maltreatment, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Baseline Functioning and Stress Reactivity in Maltreating Parents and At-Risk Adults
Published in
Child Maltreatment, July 2016
DOI 10.1177/1077559516659937
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Reijman, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Regina Hiraoka, Julie L. Crouch, Joel S. Milner, Lenneke R. A. Alink, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn

Abstract

We reviewed and meta-analyzed 10 studies (N = 492) that examined the association between (risk for) child maltreatment perpetration and basal autonomic activity, and 10 studies (N = 471) that examined the association between (risk for) child maltreatment and autonomic stress reactivity. We hypothesized that maltreating parents/at-risk adults would show higher basal levels of heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) and lower levels of HR variability (HRV) and would show greater HR and SC stress reactivity, but blunted HRV reactivity. A narrative review showed that evidence from significance testing within and across studies was mixed. The first set of meta-analyses revealed that (risk for) child maltreatment was associated with higher HR baseline activity (g = 0.24), a possible indication of allostatic load. The second set of meta-analyses yielded no differences in autonomic stress reactivity between maltreating/at-risk participants and nonmaltreating/low-risk comparison groups. Cumulative meta-analyses showed that positive effects for sympathetic stress reactivity as a risk factor for child maltreatment were found in a few early studies, whereas each subsequently aggregated study reduced the combined effect size to a null effect, an indication of the winner's curse Most studies were underpowered. Future directions for research are suggested.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 30%
Unspecified 6 15%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Master 5 13%
Other 3 8%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 48%
Unspecified 9 23%
Social Sciences 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2016.
All research outputs
#9,573,188
of 12,460,262 outputs
Outputs from Child Maltreatment
#349
of 426 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,183
of 263,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child Maltreatment
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,460,262 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 426 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.