↓ Skip to main content

Political Orientations Are Correlated with Brain Structure in Young Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 11,200)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
205 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
675 Mendeley
citeulike
8 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Political Orientations Are Correlated with Brain Structure in Young Adults
Published in
Current Biology, April 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2011.03.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryota Kanai, Tom Feilden, Colin Firth, Geraint Rees

Abstract

Substantial differences exist in the cognitive styles of liberals and conservatives on psychological measures. Variability in political attitudes reflects genetic influences and their interaction with environmental factors. Recent work has shown a correlation between liberalism and conflict-related activity measured by event-related potentials originating in the anterior cingulate cortex. Here we show that this functional correlate of political attitudes has a counterpart in brain structure. In a large sample of young adults, we related self-reported political attitudes to gray matter volume using structural MRI. We found that greater liberalism was associated with increased gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas greater conservatism was associated with increased volume of the right amygdala. These results were replicated in an independent sample of additional participants. Our findings extend previous observations that political attitudes reflect differences in self-regulatory conflict monitoring and recognition of emotional faces by showing that such attitudes are reflected in human brain structure. Although our data do not determine whether these regions play a causal role in the formation of political attitudes, they converge with previous work to suggest a possible link between brain structure and psychological mechanisms that mediate political attitudes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,816 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 675 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 31 5%
United Kingdom 13 2%
Germany 8 1%
Japan 5 <1%
France 5 <1%
China 5 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Switzerland 4 <1%
Netherlands 3 <1%
Other 19 3%
Unknown 578 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 175 26%
Researcher 111 16%
Student > Bachelor 82 12%
Student > Master 77 11%
Professor 38 6%
Other 149 22%
Unknown 43 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 237 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 107 16%
Social Sciences 78 12%
Neuroscience 40 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 5%
Other 105 16%
Unknown 73 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2109. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2020.
All research outputs
#1,485
of 15,928,902 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#11
of 11,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,404
of 14,921,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#11
of 11,195 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,928,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,200 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,921,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11,195 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.