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Total knee arthroplasty in patients with Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knee with a marked coronal femoral bowing deformity: comparison between computer-assisted surgery and intra-articular…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, August 2016
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2 tweeters

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8 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Total knee arthroplasty in patients with Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knee with a marked coronal femoral bowing deformity: comparison between computer-assisted surgery and intra-articular resection
Published in
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13018-016-0422-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tsan-Wen Huang, Po-Yao Chuang, Chien-Yin Lee, Shih-Jie Lin, Kuo-Chin Huang, Shih-Hsun Shen, Yao-Hung Tsai, Mel S. Lee, Robert Wen-Wei Hsu

Abstract

Proper limb and component alignments as well as soft tissue balance are vital for the longevity and optimal long-term outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This procedure is technically demanding in patients with Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knees with marked coronal femoral bowing. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) and intra-articular bone resection with TKA are the treatments of choice for patients with ipsilateral extra-articular deformity. In theory, both CAS and intra-articular bone resection are beneficial in Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knees with marked coronal femoral bowing deformity, but the literature on this topic is sparse. We compared the benefits of using these two techniques for TKA under this circumstance. Patients who had Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knees and marked coronal femoral bowing deformity and had undergone TKA at our hospital between 2005 and 2013 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients treated with CAS were assigned to the CAS-TKA group; patients treated with intra-articular bone resection were assigned to the Bone-Resect-TKA group. Radiographic parameters and clinical outcomes (International Knee Society (IKS) scores and patellar scores) in both groups were compared. Forty-seven patients (50 knees) met the inclusion criteria: 22 knees in the CAS-TKA group and 28 knees in the Bone-Resect-TKA group. Lateral retinaculum release was significantly (P = 0.008) higher in the Bone-Resect-TKA group. The joint-line was significantly properly restored in the CAS-TKA group (P = 0.011). The reconstructed mechanical axis was significantly (P = 0.012) closer to normal in the CAS-TKA group than in the Bone-Resect-TKA group. For component alignment, the femoral valgus and femoral flexion angles were significantly better in the CAS-TKA group (P = 0.002 and P = 0.006, respectively), but not the tibial valgus, tibial flexion, or patellar tilting angles. IKS scores and patellar scores were not significantly different between groups at a mean follow-up of 60.2 months. CAS-TKA was effective for obtaining proper alignment and joint-line restoration in patients with Ranawat type-II valgus arthritic knees and marked coronal femoral bowing deformity, but not for yielding better clinical outcomes. Additional large-scale prospective randomized cohort studies with long-term follow-ups are necessary to make evidence-based recommendations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Engineering 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,861,383
of 8,192,854 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#119
of 454 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,987
of 257,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research
#11
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,192,854 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 454 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,944 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.