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The care center influences the management of lymphoma patients in a universal health care system: an observational cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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7 Mendeley
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Title
The care center influences the management of lymphoma patients in a universal health care system: an observational cohort study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1553-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Lamy, C. Bettiol, P. Grosclaude, G. Compaci, G Albertus, C. Récher, J. C. Nogaro, F. Despas, G. Laurent, C. Delpierre

Abstract

Healthcare providers-related disparities in adherence to the treatment plan among lymphoma patients are found even in a universal healthcare system, but the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the association between the type of care center and the relative dose intensity and determined whether it persists after adjustment for patients' recruitment differences. Prospective observational cohort study of 294 patients treated with standard protocols for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in teaching or community public hospitals or in private centers in the French Midi-Pyrénées region from 2006-2013. To test our assumptions, we used multinomial and mixed-effect logistic models progressively adjusted for patients' biomedical characteristics, socio-spatial characteristics and treatment-related toxicity events. Patients treated using standard protocols in the teaching hospital had more advanced stage and poorer initial prognosis without limitation regarding the distance from the residence to the care center. Patients' recruitment profile across the different types of care center failed to explain the difference in relative dose intensity. Low relative dose intensity was less often observed in teaching hospital than elsewhere. We showed that even in a universal healthcare system, disparities in the management of DLBCL patients' do exist according to the types of care center. A main issue may be to find and diffuse the reasons of this benefit in cancer management in the teaching hospital to the other centers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 57%
Unspecified 2 29%
Mathematics 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,629,615
of 11,841,124 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,284
of 3,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,270
of 265,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#114
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,841,124 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,859 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.