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Evidence of non-response bias in the Press-Ganey patient satisfaction survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence of non-response bias in the Press-Ganey patient satisfaction survey
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1595-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. R. Tyser, A. M. Abtahi, M. McFadden, A. P. Presson

Abstract

Measures of patient satisfaction have gained prominence in recent years as changes to the American health care system have led to the incorporation of such metrics into reimbursement models. The response rate for widely-used outpatient satisfaction metrics and variables influencing the probability of survey nonresponse remain largely unknown. We reviewed all unique adult patients (16,779) who completed an outpatient encounter in the Department of Orthopaedic surgery at our academic institution from 1/1/13 to 10/24/13. Survey data was linked to each clinic visit, and patient factors including age, sex, insurance type, zip code, and orthopaedic subspecialty visited were recorded. The overall survey response rate was calculated. Logistic regression was performed, and unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of patients' probability of responding to the Press-Ganey survey were calculated. Two thousand seven hundred sixty two (16.5 %) of individuals completed a Press-Ganey patient satisfaction survey and 14017 patients did not respond. For those patients considered responders, 906 patients (32.8 %) did not complete all the survey items. Among these 906 patients, the mean number of missing items was 2.24 (Standard Deviation SD: 2.19). Age, sex, insurance type, and orthopaedic subspecialty were all found to be associated with the odds of responding to our patient satisfaction survey. Advancing age increased the odds of responding to the survey (Adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.396 for ≥65 vs. 18-29, p < 0.001). Several variables were associated with a decreased odds of survey response, and included male sex (Adjusted OR = 0.782 for Males vs. Females, p < 0.001), insurance type (Adjusted OR = 0.311 for Medicaid/Self-Pay vs. Private), and subspecialty type (Adjusted OR = 0.623 for Trauma vs. Adult Reconstruction). The response rate to the Press-Ganey Medical Practice Survey of outpatient satisfaction is low in an orthopaedic outpatient population, and furthermore, is impacted by patient characteristics such as age, sex, insurance type, and type of orthopaedic subspecialist encountered. The findings of the present study should inform future non-response weighting procedures in this area. More research is needed to assess non-response bias-including follow-up studies of non-respondents-in order to more accurately measure of patient satisfaction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Other 6 14%
Unspecified 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Other 12 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 51%
Unspecified 6 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Psychology 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 7%
Other 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2018.
All research outputs
#6,816,217
of 13,415,719 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,239
of 4,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,167
of 263,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#7
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,415,719 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,490 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.