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Symptoms and patient factors associated with longer time to diagnosis for colorectal cancer: results from a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
11 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Symptoms and patient factors associated with longer time to diagnosis for colorectal cancer: results from a prospective cohort study
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, August 2016
DOI 10.1038/bjc.2016.221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona M Walter, Jon D Emery, Silvia Mendonca, Nicola Hall, Helen C Morris, Katie Mills, Christina Dobson, Clare Bankhead, Margaret Johnson, Gary A Abel, Matthew D Rutter, William Hamilton, Greg P Rubin

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate symptoms, clinical factors and socio-demographic factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and time to diagnosis. Prospective cohort study of participants referred for suspicion of CRC in two English regions. Data were collected using a patient questionnaire, primary care and hospital records. Descriptive and regression analyses examined associations between symptoms and patient factors with total diagnostic interval (TDI), patient interval (PI), health system interval (HSI) and stage. A total of 2677 (22%) participants responded; after exclusions, 2507 remained. Participants were diagnosed with CRC (6.1%, 56% late stage), other cancers (2.0%) or no cancer (91.9%). Half the cohort had a solitary first symptom (1332, 53.1%); multiple first symptoms were common. In this referred population, rectal bleeding was the only initial symptom more frequent among cancer than non-cancer cases (34.2% vs 23.9%, P=0.004). There was no evidence of differences in TDI, PI or HSI for those with cancer vs non-cancer diagnoses (median TDI CRC 124 vs non-cancer 138 days, P=0.142). First symptoms associated with shorter TDIs were rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, 'feeling different' and fatigue/tiredness. Anxiety, depression and gastro-intestinal co-morbidities were associated with longer HSIs and TDIs. Symptom duration-dependent effects were found for rectal bleeding and change in bowel habit. Doctors and patients respond less promptly to some symptoms of CRC than others. Healthcare professionals should be vigilant to the possibility of CRC in patients with relevant symptoms and mental health or gastro-intestinal comorbidities.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 4 August 2016; doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.221 www.bjcancer.com.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 25%
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Student > Master 8 15%
Unspecified 5 9%
Other 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 40%
Unspecified 12 23%
Psychology 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2017.
All research outputs
#599,083
of 9,011,296 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#401
of 4,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,065
of 262,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#19
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,011,296 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,526 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.