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Cardiovascular Protection by ApoE and ApoE-HDL Linked to Suppression of ECM Gene Expression and Arterial Stiffening

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Reports, November 2012
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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84 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiovascular Protection by ApoE and ApoE-HDL Linked to Suppression of ECM Gene Expression and Arterial Stiffening
Published in
Cell Reports, November 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2012.09.018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Devashish Kothapalli, Shu-Lin Liu, Yong Ho Bae, James Monslow, Tina Xu, Elizabeth A. Hawthorne, Fitzroy J. Byfield, Paola Castagnino, Shilpa Rao, Daniel J. Rader, Ellen Puré, Michael C. Phillips, Sissel Lund-Katz, Paul A. Janmey, Richard K. Assoian

Abstract

Arterial stiffening is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but how arteries stay supple is unknown. Here, we show that apolipoprotein E (apoE) and apoE-containing high-density lipoprotein (apoE-HDL) maintain arterial elasticity by suppressing the expression of extracellular matrix genes. ApoE interrupts a mechanically driven feed-forward loop that increases the expression of collagen-I, fibronectin, and lysyl oxidase in response to substratum stiffening. These effects are independent of the apoE lipid-binding domain and transduced by Cox2 and miR-145. Arterial stiffness is increased in apoE null mice. This stiffening can be reduced by administration of the lysyl oxidase inhibitor BAPN, and BAPN treatment attenuates atherosclerosis despite highly elevated cholesterol. Macrophage abundance in lesions is reduced by BAPN in vivo, and monocyte/macrophage adhesion is reduced by substratum softening in vitro. We conclude that apoE and apoE-containing HDL promote healthy arterial biomechanics and that this confers protection from cardiovascular disease independent of the established apoE-HDL effect on cholesterol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Netherlands 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 91 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 31%
Researcher 24 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Unspecified 7 7%
Professor 6 6%
Other 18 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 15%
Engineering 13 14%
Unspecified 10 10%
Other 9 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2012.
All research outputs
#6,707,115
of 11,340,439 outputs
Outputs from Cell Reports
#4,222
of 4,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,673
of 122,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Reports
#60
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,340,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,883 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.4. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.