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Moderate Susceptibility to Subcutaneous Plague (Yersinia pestis) Challenge in Vaccine-Treated and Untreated Sonoran Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus sonoriensis) and Northern Grasshopper Mice (Onychom…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2021
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Title
Moderate Susceptibility to Subcutaneous Plague (Yersinia pestis) Challenge in Vaccine-Treated and Untreated Sonoran Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus sonoriensis) and Northern Grasshopper Mice (Onychomys leucogaster)
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, July 2021
DOI 10.7589/jwd-d-20-00122
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gebbiena M. Bron, Susan R. Smith, Judy D. Williamson, Daniel W. Tripp, Tonie E. Rocke

Abstract

The variable response of wild mice to Yersinia pestis infection, the causative agent of plague, has generated much speculation concerning their role in the ecology of this potentially lethal disease. Researchers have questioned the means by which Y. pestis is maintained in nature and also sought methods for managing the disease. Here we assessed the efficacy of a new tool, the sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV), in wild-caught northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster) and commercially acquired Sonoran deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus sonoriensis). More than 40% of the animals survived a subcutaneous Y. pestis challenge of 175,000 colony forming units (over 30,000 times the white mouse 50% lethal dose) in both vaccine-treated and control groups. Our results indicate that SPV distribution is unlikely to protect adult mice from plague infection in field settings and corroborate the heterogeneous response to Y. pestis infection in mice reported by others.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1 Mendeley reader of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unknown 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2021.
All research outputs
#13,419,760
of 21,514,875 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#1,024
of 1,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,262
of 331,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,514,875 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.