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The multiple evolutionary origins of the eukaryotic N-glycosylation pathway

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Direct, August 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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32 Dimensions

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94 Mendeley
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Title
The multiple evolutionary origins of the eukaryotic N-glycosylation pathway
Published in
Biology Direct, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13062-016-0137-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Lombard

Abstract

The N-glycosylation is an essential protein modification taking place in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in eukaryotes and the plasma membranes in archaea. It shares mechanistic similarities based on the use of polyisoprenol lipid carriers with other glycosylation pathways involved in the synthesis of bacterial cell wall components (e.g. peptidoglycan and teichoic acids). Here, a phylogenomic analysis was carried out to examine the validity of rival hypotheses suggesting alternative archaeal or bacterial origins to the eukaryotic N-glycosylation pathway. The comparison of several polyisoprenol-based glycosylation pathways from the three domains of life shows that most of the implicated proteins belong to a limited number of superfamilies. The N-glycosylation pathway enzymes are ancestral to the eukaryotes, but their origins are mixed: Alg7, Dpm and maybe also one gene of the glycosyltransferase 1 (GT1) superfamily and Stt3 have proteoarchaeal (TACK superphylum) origins; alg2/alg11 may have resulted from the duplication of the original GT1 gene; the lumen glycosyltransferases were probably co-opted and multiplied through several gene duplications during eukaryogenesis; Alg13/Alg14 are more similar to their bacterial homologues; and Alg1, Alg5 and a putative flippase have unknown origins. The origin of the eukaryotic N-glycosylation pathway is not unique and less straightforward than previously thought: some basic components likely have proteoarchaeal origins, but the pathway was extensively developed before the eukaryotic diversification through multiple gene duplications, protein co-options, neofunctionalizations and even possible horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. These results may have important implications for our understanding of the ER evolution and eukaryogenesis. This article was reviewed by Pr. Patrick Forterre and Dr. Sergei Mekhedov (nominated by Editorial Board member Michael Galperin).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Croatia 1 1%
Unknown 89 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 7 7%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 33%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Chemistry 4 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 20 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2016.
All research outputs
#2,740,916
of 15,918,484 outputs
Outputs from Biology Direct
#141
of 582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,731
of 267,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Direct
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,996 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them