↓ Skip to main content

The Interaction of Approach-Alcohol Action Tendencies, Working Memory Capacity, and Current Task Goals Predicts the Inability to Regulate Drinking Behavior.

Overview of attention for article published in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, October 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Interaction of Approach-Alcohol Action Tendencies, Working Memory Capacity, and Current Task Goals Predicts the Inability to Regulate Drinking Behavior.
Published in
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, October 2012
DOI 10.1037/a0029982
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sharbanee JM, Stritzke WG, Wiers RW, Young P, Rinck M, Macleod C

Abstract

The inability to regulate alcohol consumption has been attributed to an imbalance between stimulus-driven behavioral biases, or action tendencies, and the ability to exert goal-directed control, or working memory capacity (WMC). Previous research assessing the interaction between these variables has not considered the effect of whether individuals' current goals or task demands require goal-directed control. Our aim was to examine the potential interaction of appetitive action tendencies and the ability to exert control over these action tendencies as a function of whether task demands require applying control for successful task completion. Two groups of social drinkers (n = 40 per group) who differed in their ability to regulate their alcohol consumption completed a novel variant of the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT), which separately assessed approach and avoid trials. The approach and avoidance responses differentially require goal-directed control, depending on whether the task-relevant response is incongruent with the stimulus-driven action tendency. Results indicated that (a) group differences in AAT indices were only observed on trials that required an avoidance movement, which are trials where the task-relevant response would be incongruent with an approach action tendency, and (b) the extent of the group differences for these avoidance trials was moderated by individual differences in WMC, such that problem drinkers with lower WMC showed greater behavioral bias toward alcohol than those with higher WMC. These findings suggest that difficulties in regulating alcohol consumption arise from a complex interaction of action-tendencies, WMC, and current goals or task demands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 53 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 25%
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 16%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 38 69%
Unspecified 5 9%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2012.
All research outputs
#4,733,283
of 6,403,854 outputs
Outputs from Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
#921
of 973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,507
of 90,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,403,854 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 973 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 90,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.