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Morphometrics and stable isotopes differentiate wintering populations of a migratory bird

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, August 2016
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Title
Morphometrics and stable isotopes differentiate wintering populations of a migratory bird
Published in
Movement Ecology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40462-016-0085-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivan Maggini, Benjamin Metzger, Maren Voss, Christian C. Voigt, Franz Bairlein

Abstract

Describing migratory connectivity in mobile animals is crucial for understanding the selective pressures acting on different populations throughout their life cycle. Tracking single individuals has provided valuable data, but for most species the data available are still spurious and usually limited to a few individuals. Since different populations of migratory birds can be distinguished by a combination of morphometric measurements and the isotopic composition of their feathers, it is possible to measure these parameters on a large sample to differentiate populations. We studied northern wheatears, Oenanthe oenanthe, captured in their African wintering range and applied discriminant analyses on morphometric measurements and stable isotope signatures to determine whether birds found in different areas were distinguishable from each other. Morphometric and isotopic measurements alone were not sufficient to discriminate between the birds of ssp. oenanthe from different areas in Africa. When combining the two measurements, however, assignment to the different groups became substantially more accurate. Following the discriminant analysis of morphometrics and δ(2)H, δ(13)C, and δ(15)N isotopes signatures, 19 of 20 oenanthe from Kenya, 15 of 20 oenanthe from Mali/Mauritania, and 19 of 20 oenanthe from Niger were assigned correctly to their wintering area. Our results show that birds at different wintering sites can be distinguished from each other when using a combination of markers. We discuss the possible breeding origins of these wintering birds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 46 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Master 8 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 60%
Environmental Science 6 12%
Chemistry 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,216,440
of 8,187,659 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#83
of 98 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,774
of 257,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,187,659 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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