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The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2013
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2012.2114
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. A. Hawkes, S. Balachandran, N. Batbayar, P. J. Butler, B. Chua, D. C. Douglas, P. B. Frappell, Y. Hou, W. K. Milsom, S. H. Newman, D. J. Prosser, P. Sathiyaselvam, G. R. Scott, J. Y. Takekawa, T. Natsagdorj, M. Wikelski, M. J. Witt, B. Yan, C. M. Bishop

Abstract

Bar-headed geese are renowned for migratory flights at extremely high altitudes over the world's tallest mountains, the Himalayas, where partial pressure of oxygen is dramatically reduced while flight costs, in terms of rate of oxygen consumption, are greatly increased. Such a mismatch is paradoxical, and it is not clear why geese might fly higher than is absolutely necessary. In addition, direct empirical measurements of high-altitude flight are lacking. We test whether migrating bar-headed geese actually minimize flight altitude and make use of favourable winds to reduce flight costs. By tracking 91 geese, we show that these birds typically travel through the valleys of the Himalayas and not over the summits. We report maximum flight altitudes of 7290 m and 6540 m for southbound and northbound geese, respectively, but with 95 per cent of locations received from less than 5489 m. Geese travelled along a route that was 112 km longer than the great circle (shortest distance) route, with transit ground speeds suggesting that they rarely profited from tailwinds. Bar-headed geese from these eastern populations generally travel only as high as the terrain beneath them dictates and rarely in profitable winds. Nevertheless, their migration represents an enormous challenge in conditions where humans and other mammals are only able to operate at levels well below their sea-level maxima.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 85 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Master 9 10%
Other 8 9%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 76%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Mathematics 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2019.
All research outputs
#498,482
of 14,443,874 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,520
of 7,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,037
of 149,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#25
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,443,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 149,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.