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AraC-Type Regulator Rbf Controls the Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Phenotype by Negatively Regulating theicaADBCRepressor SarR

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Bacteriology, August 2016
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7 Dimensions

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Title
AraC-Type Regulator Rbf Controls the Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Phenotype by Negatively Regulating theicaADBCRepressor SarR
Published in
Journal of Bacteriology, August 2016
DOI 10.1128/jb.00374-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah E. Rowe, Christopher Campbell, Colm Lowry, Sinead T. O'Donnell, Michael E. Olson, Jill K. Lindgren, Elaine M. Waters, Paul D. Fey, James P. O'Gara

Abstract

Regulation of icaADBC-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA)/poly N-acetyl glucosasmine (PNAG) production in staphylococci plays an important role in biofilm-associated medical device-related infections. Here we report that the AraC-type transcriptional regulator Rbf activates icaADBC operon transcription and PIA production in Staphylococcus epidermidis Purified recombinant Rbf did not bind to the ica operon promoter region in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), indicating that Rbf regulates ica transcription indirectly. To identify the putative transcription factor(s) involved in Rbf-mediated icaADBC regulation, the ability of recombinant Rbf to interact with the promoter sequences of known icaADBC regulators was investigated. Recombinant Rbf bound to the sarR promoter and not the sarX, sarA, sarZ, spx and srrA promoters. RT-PCR demonstrated that Rbf acts as a repressor of sarR transcription. PIA expression and biofilm production were restored to wild type levels in an rbf/sarR double mutant grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) media supplemented with NaCl, which is known to activate the ica locus, but not in BHI media alone. RT-PCR further demonstrated that although Rbf does not bind the sarX promoter, it nevertheless exerted a negative effect on sarX expression. Apparently direct down-regulation of the SarR repressor by Rbf has a dominant effect over indirect repression of the SarX activator by Rbf in the control of S. epidermidis PIA production and biofilm formation. The importance of Staphylococcus epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen in hospital patients with implanted medical devices derives largely from its capacity to form biofilm. Expression of the icaADBC-encoded extracellular polysaccharide is the predominant biofilm mechanism in S. epidermidis clinical isolates and is tightly regulated. Here we report that the transcriptional regulator Rbf promotes icaADBC expression by negatively regulating expression of sarR, which encodes an ica operon repressor. Furthermore Rbf indirectly represses the ica operon activator SarX. The data reveal complicated interplay between Rbf and two Sar family proteins in fine-tuning regulation of the biofilm phenotype and indicate that in the hierarchy of biofilm regulators, IcaR is dominant over the Rbf-SarR-SarX axis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,570,425
of 12,359,868 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Bacteriology
#8,980
of 10,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,078
of 263,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Bacteriology
#46
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,359,868 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,744 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,944 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.