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Structure and function of methanogenic microbial communities in sediments of Amazonian lakes with different water types

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Structure and function of methanogenic microbial communities in sediments of Amazonian lakes with different water types
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, August 2016
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.13491
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yang Ji, Roey Angel, Melanie Klose, Peter Claus, Humberto Marotta, Luana Pinho, Alex Enrich-Prast, Ralf Conrad

Abstract

Tropical lake sediments are a significant source for the greenhouse gas methane. We studied function (pathway, rate) and structure (abundance, taxonomic composition) of the microbial communities (Bacteria, Archaea) leading to methane formation together with the main physicochemical characteristics in the sediments of four clear water, six white water and three black water lakes of the Amazon River system. Concentrations of sulfate and ferric iron, pH and δ(13) C of organic carbon were usually higher, while concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and rates of CH4 production were generally lower in white water versus clear water or black water sediments. Copy numbers of bacterial and especially archaeal ribosomal RNA genes also tended to be relatively lower in white water sediments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis contributed 58 ± 16% to total CH4 production in all systems. Network analysis identified six communities, of which four were comprised mostly of bacteria found in all sediment types, while two were mostly in clear water sediment. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and pyrosequencing showed that the compositions of the communities differed between the different sediment systems, statistically related to the particular physicochemical conditions and to CH4 production rates. Among the archaea, clear water, white water, and black water sediments contained relatively more Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae and Methanocellales, respectively, while Methanosaetaceae were common in all systems. Proteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria (Myxococcales, Syntrophobacterales, sulfate reducers) in particular, Acidobacteria and Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial phyla in all sediment systems. Among the other important bacterial phyla, clear water sediments contained relatively more Alphaproteobacteria and Planctomycetes, whereas white water sediments contained relatively more Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi than the respective other sediment system. The data showed communities of bacteria common to all sediment types, but also revealed microbial groups that were significantly different between the sediment types, which also differed in physicochemical conditions. Our study showed that function of the microbial communities may be understood on the basis of their structures, which in turn are determined by environmental heterogeneity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 48 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Master 10 19%
Unspecified 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 38%
Environmental Science 12 23%
Unspecified 9 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,633,930
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#574
of 2,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,395
of 266,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#54
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,951 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.