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State-civil society partnerships for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention in Ghana: exploring factors associated with successes and challenges

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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4 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
State-civil society partnerships for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention in Ghana: exploring factors associated with successes and challenges
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1598-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Hushie, Cephas N. Omenyo, Jacob J. van den Berg, Michelle A. Lally

Abstract

The past decade has seen an increased number of state-civil society partnerships in the global Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) response of many countries. However, there has been limited research carried out concerning the successes and challenges of these partnerships. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 participants from 21 different state-civil society partnerships throughout Ghana including all three major geographical zones (Northern, Middle, and Southern zones) to examine the nature of these partnerships and their positive and negative effects in responding to the national HIV/AIDS epidemic. Major themes included: 1) commitment by the government and civil society organizations to work cooperatively in order to support the development and implementation of HIV/AIDS interventions in Ghana; 2) the role of civil society organizations in facilitating community mobilization; capacity building; and information, resources and skills exchange to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of these partnerships for HIV prevention and treatment; and 3) significant challenges including funding issues and other structural barriers for these partnerships that need to be addressed moving forward. Future research should focus on examining the impact of recommended changes on state-civil partnerships and studying the extent and nature of these partnerships in other countries in order to establish the generalizability of the findings from this study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 34%
Student > Bachelor 7 24%
Unspecified 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 21%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Other 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,208,327
of 8,348,788 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,986
of 3,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,357
of 258,258 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#142
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,348,788 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,106 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,258 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.