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Social Features of Online Networks: The Strength of Intermediary Ties in Online Social Media

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
69 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
125 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
354 Mendeley
citeulike
23 CiteULike
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Title
Social Features of Online Networks: The Strength of Intermediary Ties in Online Social Media
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0029358
Pubmed ID
Authors

Przemyslaw A. Grabowicz, José J. Ramasco, Esteban Moro, Josep M. Pujol, Victor M. Eguiluz

Abstract

An increasing fraction of today's social interactions occur using online social media as communication channels. Recent worldwide events, such as social movements in Spain or revolts in the Middle East, highlight their capacity to boost people's coordination. Online networks display in general a rich internal structure where users can choose among different types and intensity of interactions. Despite this, there are still open questions regarding the social value of online interactions. For example, the existence of users with millions of online friends sheds doubts on the relevance of these relations. In this work, we focus on Twitter, one of the most popular online social networks, and find that the network formed by the basic type of connections is organized in groups. The activity of the users conforms to the landscape determined by such groups. Furthermore, Twitter's distinction between different types of interactions allows us to establish a parallelism between online and offline social networks: personal interactions are more likely to occur on internal links to the groups (the weakness of strong ties); events transmitting new information go preferentially through links connecting different groups (the strength of weak ties) or even more through links connecting to users belonging to several groups that act as brokers (the strength of intermediary ties).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 354 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 4%
United Kingdom 9 3%
Spain 5 1%
Netherlands 4 1%
Germany 4 1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Switzerland 3 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Other 16 5%
Unknown 292 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 101 29%
Student > Master 58 16%
Researcher 55 16%
Student > Bachelor 26 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 7%
Other 89 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 87 25%
Social Sciences 85 24%
Business, Management and Accounting 40 11%
Physics and Astronomy 28 8%
Unspecified 17 5%
Other 97 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 61. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2017.
All research outputs
#240,398
of 12,420,234 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#4,873
of 136,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,024
of 140,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#97
of 4,252 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,420,234 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136,472 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 140,511 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,252 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.