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The Brain's Default Network

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, April 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 10,269)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
15 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
6 tweeters
patent
12 patents
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
5874 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5648 Mendeley
citeulike
13 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
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Title
The Brain's Default Network
Published in
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, April 2008
DOI 10.1196/annals.1440.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Randy L. Buckner, Jessica R. Andrews-Hanna, Daniel L. Schacter

Abstract

Thirty years of brain imaging research has converged to define the brain's default network-a novel and only recently appreciated brain system that participates in internal modes of cognition. Here we synthesize past observations to provide strong evidence that the default network is a specific, anatomically defined brain system preferentially active when individuals are not focused on the external environment. Analysis of connectional anatomy in the monkey supports the presence of an interconnected brain system. Providing insight into function, the default network is active when individuals are engaged in internally focused tasks including autobiographical memory retrieval, envisioning the future, and conceiving the perspectives of others. Probing the functional anatomy of the network in detail reveals that it is best understood as multiple interacting subsystems. The medial temporal lobe subsystem provides information from prior experiences in the form of memories and associations that are the building blocks of mental simulation. The medial prefrontal subsystem facilitates the flexible use of this information during the construction of self-relevant mental simulations. These two subsystems converge on important nodes of integration including the posterior cingulate cortex. The implications of these functional and anatomical observations are discussed in relation to possible adaptive roles of the default network for using past experiences to plan for the future, navigate social interactions, and maximize the utility of moments when we are not otherwise engaged by the external world. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the default network for understanding mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5,648 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 123 2%
United Kingdom 55 <1%
Germany 37 <1%
Spain 17 <1%
Italy 16 <1%
France 16 <1%
Netherlands 14 <1%
Canada 13 <1%
Japan 11 <1%
Other 116 2%
Unknown 5230 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1279 23%
Researcher 980 17%
Student > Master 891 16%
Student > Bachelor 756 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 355 6%
Other 1053 19%
Unknown 334 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 2290 41%
Neuroscience 798 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 682 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 548 10%
Engineering 171 3%
Other 528 9%
Unknown 631 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 164. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2019.
All research outputs
#113,015
of 15,491,261 outputs
Outputs from Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
#27
of 10,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,941
of 14,539,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
#27
of 10,037 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,491,261 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,269 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,539,479 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10,037 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.