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Effects of immunostimulation on social behavior, chemical communication and genome-wide gene expression in honey bee workers (Apis mellifera)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2012
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Citations

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117 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of immunostimulation on social behavior, chemical communication and genome-wide gene expression in honey bee workers (Apis mellifera)
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-13-558
Pubmed ID
Authors

Freddie-Jeanne Richard, Holly L Holt, Christina M Grozinger

Abstract

Social insects, such as honey bees, use molecular, physiological and behavioral responses to combat pathogens and parasites. The honey bee genome contains all of the canonical insect immune response pathways, and several studies have demonstrated that pathogens can activate expression of immune effectors. Honey bees also use behavioral responses, termed social immunity, to collectively defend their hives from pathogens and parasites. These responses include hygienic behavior (where workers remove diseased brood) and allo-grooming (where workers remove ectoparasites from nestmates). We have previously demonstrated that immunostimulation causes changes in the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of workers, which results in altered worker-worker social interactions. Thus, cuticular hydrocarbons may enable workers to identify sick nestmates, and adjust their behavior in response. Here, we test the specificity of behavioral, chemical and genomic responses to immunostimulation by challenging workers with a panel of different immune stimulants (saline, Sephadex beads and Gram-negative bacteria E. coli).

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Austria 2 2%
France 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 110 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 28%
Researcher 19 16%
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 16 14%
Unknown 6 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 16%
Chemistry 3 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2012.
All research outputs
#10,995,830
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#6,426
of 7,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,455
of 136,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#83
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,313 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.