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Frequency of zoonotic bacteria among illegally traded wild birds in Rio de Janeiro

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, October 2016
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Title
Frequency of zoonotic bacteria among illegally traded wild birds in Rio de Janeiro
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjm.2016.07.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos Alexandre Rey Matias, Ingrid Annes Pereira, Eliane Moura Falavina dos Reis, Dália dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Salvatore Siciliano

Abstract

The illegal wildlife trade may increase the risk of infectious disease transmission, and it may not only cause disease outbreaks in humans but also threaten livestock, native wild populations, and ecosystems' health. Bird species may act as carriers in the transmission of enteric pathogens. However, epidemiological studies on zoonotic bacteria in wild birds are rare in Brazil. From March 2011 to March 2012, we investigated the frequency of Enterobacteriaceae in cloacal swab samples from 109 birds of the passerine and Psittacidae families. These birds were recovered from illegal trade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and sent to a rehabilitation center. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 86 wild birds (78.9%). A mean (±SD) of 1.68 (±1.30) different bacterial species were isolated per bird, with a maximum of five bacterial species from three bird species. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli, followed by Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and other enteric bacteria. Salmonella ser. Typhimurium was isolated from a Temminck's seedeater (Sporophila falcirostris), and two Salmonella ser. Panama were isolated from two specimens of chestnut-capped blackbird (Chrysomus ruficapillus). Of the 70 selected bacterial isolates, 60 exhibited antibiotic resistance. The resistance patterns varied from one to nine of the antibiotics tested. Resistance to ceftiofur was the most prevalent, followed by ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The dissemination potential of resistant strains in situations typically seen in the management of captive birds may become a problem for the conservation of natural bird populations and for public health.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 14 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,893,119
of 12,355,257 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#263
of 363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,042
of 263,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#7
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,355,257 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 363 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.