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SPACE-TIME MODELS FOR A PANZOOTIC IN BATS, WITH A FOCUS ON THE ENDANGERED INDIANA BAT

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2012
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

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Citations

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Title
SPACE-TIME MODELS FOR A PANZOOTIC IN BATS, WITH A FOCUS ON THE ENDANGERED INDIANA BAT
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2012
DOI 10.7589/2011-06-176
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wayne E. Thogmartin, R. Andrew King, Jennifer A. Szymanski, Lori Pruitt

Abstract

Knowledge of current trends of quickly spreading infectious wildlife diseases is vital to efficient and effective management. We developed space-time mixed-effects logistic regressions to characterize a disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS), quickly spreading among endangered Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) in eastern North America. Our goal was to calculate and map the risk probability faced by uninfected colonies of hibernating Indiana bats. Model covariates included annual distance from and direction to nearest sources of infection, geolocational information, size of the Indiana bat populations within each wintering population, and total annual size of populations known or suspected to be affected by WNS. We considered temporal, spatial, and spatiotemporal formulae through the use of random effects for year, complex (a collection of interacting hibernacula), and year × complex. Since first documented in 2006, WNS has spread across much of the range of the Indiana bat. No sizeable wintering population now occurs outside of the migrational distance of an infected source. Annual rates of newly affected wintering Indiana bat populations between winter 2007 to 2008 and 2010 to 2011 were 4, 6, 8, and 12%; this rate increased each year at a rate of 3%. If this increasing rate of newly affected populations continues, all wintering populations may be affected by 2016. Our models indicated the probability of a wintering population exhibiting infection was a linear function of proximity to affected Indiana bat populations and size of the at-risk population. Geographic location was also important, suggesting broad-scale influences. For every 50-km increase in distance from a WNS-affected population, risk of disease declined by 6% (95% CI=5.2-5.7%); for every increase of 1,000 Indiana bats, there was an 8% (95% CI = 1-21%) increase in disease risk. The increasing rate of infection seems to be associated with the movement of this disease into the core of the Indiana bat range. Our spatially explicit estimates of disease risk may aid managers in prioritizing surveillance and management for wintering populations of Indiana bats and help understand the risk faced by other hibernating bat species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 7%
Unknown 50 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 43%
Other 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 17%
Environmental Science 7 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2012.
All research outputs
#1,989,414
of 4,729,227 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#301
of 583 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,581
of 80,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,729,227 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 583 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 80,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them