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Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 infection in an Indigenous Australian population: epidemiological insights from a hospital-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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Title
Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 infection in an Indigenous Australian population: epidemiological insights from a hospital-based cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3366-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lloyd Einsiedel, Richard J. Woodman, Maria Flynn, Kim Wilson, Olivier Cassar, Antoine Gessain

Abstract

The Human T Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) subtype C is endemic to central Australia where each of the major sequelae of HTLV-1 infection has been documented in the socially disadvantaged Indigenous population. Nevertheless, available epidemiological information relating to HTLV-1c infection is very limited, risk factors for transmission are unknown and no coordinated program has been implemented to reduce transmission among Indigenous Australians. Identifying risk factors for HTLV-1 infection is essential to direct strategies that could control HTLV-1 transmission. Risk factors for HTLV-1 infection were retrospectively determined for a cohort of Indigenous Australians who were tested for HTLV-1 at Alice Springs Hospital (ASH), 1st January 2000 to 30th June 2013. Demographic details were obtained from the ASH patient management database and the results of tests for sexually transmitted infections (STI) were obtained from the ASH pathology database. Among 1889 Indigenous patients whose HTLV-1 serostatus was known, 635 (33.6 %) were HTLV-1 Western blot positive. Only one of 77 (1.3 %) children tested was HTLV-1 infected. Thereafter, rates progressively increased with age (15-29 years, 17.3 %; 30-49 years, 36.2 %; 50-64 years, 41.7 %) reaching 48.5 % among men aged 50-64 years. In a multivariable model, increasing age (OR, 1.04; 95 % CI, 1.03-1.04), male gender (OR, 1.41; 95 % CI, 1.08-1.85), residence in the south (OR, 10.7; 95 % CI, 7.4-15.6) or west (OR, 4.4; 95 % CI, 3.1-6.3) of central Australia and previous STI (OR, 1.42; 95 % CI, 1.04-1.95) were associated with HTLV-1 infection. Infection was acquired by three of 351 adults who were tested more than once during the study period (seroconversion rate, 0.24 (95 % CI = 0.18-2.48) per 100 person-years). This study confirms that HTLV-1 is highly endemic to central Australia. Although childhood infection was documented, HTLV-1 infection in adults was closely associated with increasing age, male gender and STI history. Multiple modes of transmission are therefore likely to contribute to high rates of HTLV-1 infection in the Indigenous Australian population. Future strategies to control HTLV-1 transmission in this population require careful community engagement, cultural understanding and Indigenous leadership.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Other 6 18%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2019.
All research outputs
#566,134
of 15,922,891 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#557
of 10,955 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,037
of 267,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#2
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,891 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,955 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,918 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.