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Origin of measles virus: divergence from rinderpest virus between the 11th and 12th centuries

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 2,449)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
29 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
96 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
265 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Origin of measles virus: divergence from rinderpest virus between the 11th and 12th centuries
Published in
Virology Journal, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1743-422x-7-52
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuki Furuse, Akira Suzuki, Hitoshi Oshitani

Abstract

Measles, caused by measles virus (MeV), is a common infection in children. MeV is a member of the genus Morbillivirus and is most closely related to rinderpest virus (RPV), which is a pathogen of cattle. MeV is thought to have evolved in an environment where cattle and humans lived in close proximity. Understanding the evolutionary history of MeV could answer questions related to divergence times of MeV and RPV. We investigated divergence times using relaxed clock Bayesian phylogenetics. Our estimates reveal that MeV had an evolutionary rate of 6.0-6.5 x 10(-4) substitutions/site/year. It was concluded that the divergence time of the most recent common ancestor of current MeV was the early 20th century. And, divergence between MeV and RPV occurred around the 11th to 12th centuries. The result was unexpected because emergence of MeV was previously considered to have occurred in the prehistoric age. MeV may have originated from virus of non-human species and caused emerging infectious diseases around the 11th to 12th centuries. In such cases, investigating measles would give important information about the course of emerging infectious diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 265 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
France 3 1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Afghanistan 1 <1%
Thailand 1 <1%
Unknown 251 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 63 24%
Researcher 38 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 14%
Student > Master 35 13%
Professor 15 6%
Other 48 18%
Unknown 28 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 41 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 39 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 20 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 3%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 40 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 324. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 August 2020.
All research outputs
#49,734
of 16,074,900 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#7
of 2,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,069
of 15,055,777 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#7
of 2,449 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,074,900 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 15,055,777 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,449 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.